Health Discussion

Discussion about exposure to elements and conditions in Nike Missile work, and their possible relationship to cancer or other health conditions.

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Those of you who are suffering from exposure to Agent Orange (dioxin) can sign a petition to get our government to acknowledge that dioxin was used as a defoliant on South Korean Nike sites.http://petitions.moveon.org/sign/equality-wrt-vet-dioxin

213 responses to “Health Discussion”

  1. Mickey Finn says:

    Hello my name is Thomas H. (Mickey) Finn. From June of 1958 to Aug. of 1961 I was stationed at Battery D 4th Missile Battalion 4th Artillery in Poulsbo, Wa. During most of that time I was a fuel handler and was exposed to UDMH and Red Fuming Nitric Acid. As I’m sure you know, I was required to have periodic blood testing to determined any possible effects from these chemicals on my body. Two or three times in that time frame my blood count was such that I was removed from the team until my blood count fell back with in the acceptable range. Each time it did and I returned to fueling and defueling. Unfortunately all of those medical records from Ft. Lawton, Wa. have been lost by the US Army. In 2004 I was diagnosed with esophageal cancer. After months of radiation and chemotherapy treatment my cancer is now in remission. The VA has rejected my claims that my exposure to these fuels (which would be in my medical records) had no baring on my cancer as I had been a smoker. Without my medical records the VA will not accept the possibility the chemicals from fueling could have been a contributing factor in my cancer . I’m wondering if there is anyone out there who may have had or has esophageal cancer that was or could be attributed to their exposure to these chemicals. If so how was it proven to the VA? Any advice and or help would be greatly appreciated. Thank you.

    Mickey Finn

    • Michael Labriola says:

      Hello Mr. Finn,
      I was in the Pennslyvania Air Defense National Guard, 708th anti-aircraft battalion, in Pittsburgh. I was the assembly sergeant on the 90mm first and then the AJAX in 1958 to ’62 then I started in ’62 on the Nike Hercules missile. We had inspections constantly. The stress factor was through the roof as you can imagine– as you know. I also fueled the AJAX missile with red fuming nitric acid and UDMH or “SLUG,” our slang term. Personally, I had open-heart surgery in my early 50’s and many, many other procedures like stents, etc., having to do with my heart. The cancer I had was actually in the Epiglottis; was first deemed unknown. It was not caused from smoking, and my doctor was so perplexed that he had to send the sample to U.C. San Francisco to try and figure it out. I went through 35 radiation treatments and now so far so good. I also believe that this cancer was caused from my exposure to such toxic chemicals and all the stress of those years–have all played a role in my health conditions. (Written as dictated for my father)by M. Labriola…

    • Tom Bromley says:

      Yesterday I had a face-to-face conversation with my congressman, Jason Smith. I have been working with him and his staff for a lengthly period of time, along with other Nike vets. Their staff at this time is working on a bill to through congress to try to get us taken care of with the VA. He advised me in our closing conversation it would behoove all of you who are ill and suffering with the same effects and the ones who lost their loved ones to contact their congressmen, so when this bill is brought forth, that more of them will be aware of what is going on and how the VA is not taking care of us. Good luck to all of you. Tom

  2. D. Wasler says:

    Seeking information about Nike veterans suit (circa 2004-2006) over radar and radioactive elements exposure during active duty. dwasler@yahoo.com

  3. Jennifer Hrncir says:

    Seeking information about veterans who were stationed in California at the Nike Hercules Missile site. Has anyone developed any tumors (i.e. meninignomas)? Please send me any information that will help me to understand if my late husband Robert Craig Hrncir, sp. could have been exposed to radiation at this site. He was stationed there 1972 -1974. Thanks

  4. Carl Palmer says:

    From: Veteran Carl Palmer of Seattle, WA
    To: To all U.S. Military Veterans who served with ADA or any Air Surveillance Radar system
    Subject:Exposure to ionizing radiation

    ACTIVE PROBLEM: Personal History Of Exposure To Ionizing Radiation (ICD-9-CM V15.89)

    Ref: Veterans Health Benefits Handbook, July 2012, Chapter 3, Page 19.
    Ref: Ionizing Radiation Review, Volume 5, February 2011
    Ref: http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures/radiation/
    Ref: http://www.va.gov/irad

    I just returned from the Seattle VA Hospital and I am now on the VA Health Registry for Occupational Exposure of a US Veteran During Military Service with the HAWK ADA Missile System.

    Ionizing Radiation is defined by the VA as Atmospheric Nuclear Weapon Exposure, Particle Radiation, i.e. Nuclear Waste Disposal and Dirty Bomb Attacks.

    … [Palmer states that even people exposed to radar are entitled to the following exam]

    Even if you have no symptoms, you are entitled to a Free Specialized And Comprehensive Health Examination provided by a VA Environmental Health (EH) technician, which I received today.

    Though the Army paid for my cataract procedure in both eyes, I was informed today that this is considered service connected for those on the registry.

    Contact your Local E H Coordinator to request information about registry examinations. http://www.publichealth.va.gov/exposures or 1-800-749-8387.

    Good Luck,

    Carl Palmer / Seattle WA

    No matter if you have medical problems that may link to this or not, it is suggested that you should register!

    By Ed Thelen:
    I try to explain that the RF energy from Nike radar is not “ionizing” and therefore not a known cause of cancer.

    There is a known cooking effect of concentrated radar microwaves, just like in your microwave oven they can heat things, and unfortunately, the lens and cornea systems in our eyes do not sense heat. Apparently you can cook one of your corneas and not be aware ’till too late.
    I have not heard of any such “incidents” but it is a known hazard. We are talking about looking down the wave guide or into a feed horn. The disbursed energy from, say, a radar reflector is too weak, fortunately ;-))
    -Ed Thelen

    • Robert (Bob) Belli says:

      I, too, worked in the Nike Radar field (23N20) but at the ‘depot’ level where we serviced 5 Nike firing batteries around Fairbanks, Ak. This was back in 1966-1967. I’ve read the above comments with great interest as I have had testicular ‘troubles’. Five years ago, my left testicle was removed due to a (non-maligant, thank God) tumor. I can’t help wondering if my year in school and 15 months working on Lopar and Hipar Radar had something to do with this abnormal condition.
      Thanks to the information received here, I will contact my Environmental Health Coordinator at my local VA.
      Thanks

      • Bob,

        I was assigned security to A-4-1 in Gaithersburg MD from 1969-1970 and have had similar issues as well since 1970. In 1973 when I was due to be discharged from the ARMY I was told that I needed to be tested for sterility due to my duty station at A-4-1. I was tested and found to be sterile over a 3 month period. I was told that if I did not sign a waiver that I would be held over until I was cured. I was 23 at the time and have had testicular issues even now. I currently work with Microwave systems and am well aware of the hazards and safety precautions as well as permissible exposure rates allowed. The VA has denied the claim for sterility.

    • Michelle says:

      While it is true that the RF energy is non-ionizing, the problem is with the vacuum tubes–which DID emit ionizing radiation. The vacuum tubes emitted parasitic x-rays (also called bremsstrahlung radiation). Whether those parasitic x-rays were directed at personnel is hard to say, but the possibility exists that men were exposed to ionizing radiation.
      – Michelle Yeoman
      MS biology from Texas A&M University

      • Steve says:

        Did the tubes in the radar use more than 16 thousand volts? That is the threshold for producing x-rays. I have worked with radar to a certain degree and never saw operating voltages anywhere near that high.

        • Michelle says:

          Hi Steve,

          From examining Ed Thelen’s website, the tubes operated at 50,000 volts. However, not all of the tubes were at that voltage all of the time, which makes it hard (but not impossible) to calculate the amount of radiation dosage that personnel were exposed to.

          • Gary says:

            Hi. I worked in the 24P MOS (acquisition radar). I’m 62 and luckily no ill effects yet except for the constant loud ringing in my ears from the 400 cycle hum in the trailers. In the Hipar transmitter van the High voltage Cabinet would generate voltages of around 30 to 50 thousand volts and the plate voltage of the Klystron tube was upwards of 189 thousand volts if memory serves me correctly.

        • Gwen Carson says:

          My Dad, Nathan Rector, worked at Nike site LA-55. He was in the National Guard and was there from 1958 until it was shut down. He was exposed to ionizing radiation from being around the tubes, which he said leaked sometimes. He died in 2008 from Myelogenous Leukemia. We tried to see about him getting compensated for his illness due to exposure before he passed. They wanted exact dates he was exposed. Kind of hard to pinpoint exact days over a 29 year history. He also had bladder cancer and tinnitis, which I am positive was from his work environment.

        • Vincent Pfeiffer says:

          Re: Vacuum tubes exceeding 16kv.

          Some of you may be aware that we used the tpsy1d and 1g as an exciter radar input to the 5 megawatt units. The input voltage was 50kw.
          The radar scopes all produced voltages in excess of 37kw, which as anyone working in the field, knows, is also a vacuum tube.
          Xray techs are not working with scopes, and therefore not exposed to the potential voltages inherent in high power radars.
          Scopes on any radar can and do produce energy levels in excess of 16kv.
          While going through radar school at Ft. Monmouth, we had 2 S. Korean Army officers in our class. Squirrels had built a nest in one of the feed horns of the radar antennas. (6 total) Our instructor ordered us to deradiate our sets, aim all antennas away from the antenna we were to be working on.
          Our class and the instructor (Dombrowski), climbed up to the antenna feed horn to remove the nest. While standing on the platform around the antenna we all noticed how warm we all were beginning to get. This was in December, in New Jersey. We looked around the antenna group and saw one antenna pointed directly at the antenna we were working on. Our group climbed back down and reentered the classroom, where we discovered those two officers staring at the radar scope and yucking it up. The radar was in the energized condition and radiating.
          The instructor reprimanded the two officers, for their careless act, while we returned to the antenna feedhorn to complete the removal of the nest.
          We were aware of the radiation hazards but at the time did not think we suffered any ill effects.
          My daughter was born with a congenital heart block and has had a pacemaker since age 6. My son died of type 1 diabetes July 2013. I suffer from skin cancer, non-malignant at the moment.
          The static arcing ball arrestor on the back of the radar sets could produce static charges in excess of many hundreds of thousands of volts. Part of our training was to learn how to properly discharge that energy before attempting to work on the sets.
          The premise that there is no possibility of being exposed to voltages above 16kv is laughable. Indeed, such exposure was common. Not only were we, as repair personnel, exposed, but so was anyone in close proximity to a radiating set.
          The basic TPSY 1D OR 1G produced outputs of 50 kilowatts. The outputs from the High power units, again, produced an output of 5 million watts. That energy level is deadly at 1/4 mile.

      • Terry Olliges says:

        Michelle, I need your assistance if you don’t mind. Please call me at your earliest convenience at 502-612-2099. Thank you.

    • Larry Francis says:

      ED,
      You are just plain wrong about non-ionizing radiation not having negative effects on humans. You might want to take a look at this new study in 2017 in China. Non-ionizing radiation does affect the brain.

      https://mmrjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40779-017-0139-0

      Larry Francis PhD Student, MPA, BAIS, ASET
      Nike Ajax System Veteran
      US Navy TD2 Pinecastle Electronic Warfare Range 72-76

  5. Terry Olliges says:

    Developed renal cell cancer and have multiple illnesses after being a Nike Herc missile crewman. Fighting VA for benefits but have been fighting the exposure to radiation portion. Received 10% for hypertension. Feel these are due to radiation exposure and radar.

    • TERRY:
      How did you get 10% for hypertention? See my post below yours on The Nike Historical page!

      • Terry Olliges says:

        Jake, I received the 10% because I had hypertension/high blood pressure beginning right after I was in the army and was being treated from 73-76 during my enlistment. I was in from 1972 – 1976. Since I was being treated in the army it was considered service related.

    • Rafael Nieves says:

      Mr Olliges

      I worked a a missile crewman between 1978-1981 in Zweibrucken Germany 2/56 Delta Battery. Besides the stress of having to run towards Nikes every once in awhile to dismantle hatches to take care of smoking faulty old batteries surrounded by other nike’s rocket engines, feeling strangely tire without any reason during our routine checks. Sleeping and eating around the Nikes for days downrange. And we could tell every time the radar was on in the hill we would feel physically overtired we use to talk about it down range all the time. Since some times during transfers our officers would need help in other sections, some of us were trained to do other jobs, drive to the radar to take dinner there and even other areas such as having to deal with warhead maintenance, the old red podium as as you probably remember everything was a procedure by the book, just like all other missile crewman maintenance procedures, by the book. The point is, I remember a sergeant that had been sick from what we thought was cancer, we heard it was from some sort of exposure and a warrant officer that had been there for a longer time, he was already diagnosed with cancer as well. Of course we did not want to talk about it but he did. I was and I’m still am proud of the fact we did what we had to do. Hey together with NATO we held what it would have been a major war between Russia and USA we really did our mission. and I could not be more proud of all of us. However, it was towards the beginning of the end of the cold war, and tensions in all these sites was super high during numerous high alerts and our families constant drills to leave Europe by planes did not stop then. There were many other things that happened during our years as I am sure since the beginning of the cold war. What really gets me is that right now I’m been treated for this strange disease in my throat, I’m constantly coughing, I don’t smoke or ever had, I just turned 60 but at 36 I had a heart attack from stress, from not been able to sleep and from not knowing how to stop once I start working with a deadline. I also became a workaholic and I did very well because I became this perfectionist implementing procedures in my own companies and in other large companies I ran divisions and helped them grow very fast and did very well. sadly though I have gone through two devastating divorces, not ever stopping to work because while I did everything for my family and former wives, I did not realize I was going to be diagnosed with post traumatic syndrome, years later, panic attacks, not been able to sleep, blackout etc. I don’t say this because I want to complain about what we did, we did what we did because is definitely worth it, to defend this great country of ours, and so many others have done so much more, lot more. However it does feel unfair that as we become older I started to realize, these experiences did somehow affect my family and I and so many other like me and much worst. And I don’t know if any of your recall visits to see the doctor while in duty overseas. I had to make a stop across the hall from the doctor’s office at the hospital, and my medical files were taken out of a safe with chains around it I had to sign for the files and take them with me to see the doctor then return these files right at the hospital again so they could again put it in the safe. Why this was done, and why when I asked for my medical files I never got them to take back home? Right now I am already taking anti-depressant, anti-anxiety and a sleeping pill to be able to sleep, and a heart pill for hypertension, all medicine dosages raised by a psychiatrist twice and even though I became very efficient at what I did after passing out more than 5 times in what it was then executive positions I slowly started to not been able to perform any longer. Today I am living day by day and I am very grateful for our nation and what it stands for. And I would do it again as many times as necessary. But there is so much more this country needs to do for our veterans and their dependants. Never mind me, but be fair to someone like you Mr Olligues and so many others. Thanks so much Mr Olliges for your service brother. I hope everything is better by now, take good care of your self.

  6. Rafael Nieves says:

    I spent from 1979 to 1981 in Germany in a Nike Herc site as a missile crewman. After I came back to the US, I developed hypertension and at 36 I had a heart attack. I also dealt with depression and kept blacking out to the point that I can not hold a steady job any longer after having a very successful career in broadcast. Sometimes I wonder if it had to do with the radiation we were exposed during the years in Germany. Alpha radiation and or some sort of microwaves coming from the radar?. The crew could feel it and we use to talk about it. We even had some incidents of a couple of guys being standing on top of the trailers near the radar as the radar was turned on. Those guys got hurt. I remember my friends and I becoming very tired just by spending an hour down range. A warrant officer being diagnosed with cancer all over his body at the time, an even gum bleeding by some of those that worked in the shop for a long time. Don’t get me wrong. I love our country, I love to work and what we did. I would do it again any time. But I think if someone is getting sick from it we should recognized it and they should be compensated for it. I also wanted to always know, why they would keep our medical records in a safe with chains around it?

  7. Patrice Shelton Lassiter says:

    My father, Waytus Cliffor Shelton, served in the 976th Air Defense Battalion, battery B, from approximately 1954-1957. He served during the time they had the Nike Ajax missiles. Sadly he passed away in late 2011 from asbestos related cancer in the lungs and other parts of his body. Can anyone who served during this time in the same areas (Fort Bliss, Texas, White Sands, New Mexico and Ansonia, Conn) contact me via email powerpointepub@yahoo.com Also, if anyone has experience lung cancer or other medical issues from serving in the Nike program, would you please contact me.

  8. Ok folks–here’s my summary!
    I was a 16C radar operator and then a 24Q chief fire control mech. Attended the 24P radar course at Bliss. Served from ’59 to ’79. Twenty years in the Nike system.
    I am treated in the VA system although I am 73 and on medicare. I still use the VA, because I believe they OWE me for my twenty years of service that I was promised upon my enlistment.
    Like all service connected disabilities, most don’t show up until years later down the road.
    Served in Alaska in buildings with exposed pipes wrapped in asbestos, even in the mess hall. Have pictures of the now decommissioned sites with signs saying CONTAMINATED DO NOT ENTER!
    Have been contacted by someone about the use of tricloretheleyne on a site in Union Lake, Mich, about ground contamination, and gave testimony that “yes we washed electronic parts and then dumped the liquid along the fence line to control weeds”! Also while as Chief FC Mech, I had a kid override the interlock on the HiPar antenna and enter the dome and get burned while the antenna was not rotating. He was sent to a hospital and don’t know what ever happened to him.
    Was at Sea Range, the firing site in Korea in 72, and have documentation of AO being used on all 38th brigade sites at that time, to defoliate the fence lines. AO exposure is only being recognized on the DMZ.
    I have hearing aids supplied by the VA.
    Had cataracts removed in both eyes, covered by Medicare.
    Had colon cancer three years ago, treated by the VA.
    Have joint problems in legs, shoulder and knees.
    Claimed exposure to ionized radiation, 400 cycle hum, asbestos, tricloretheleyne and possible AO.
    VA has denied all my claims basically saying, I’m just getting old, and I didn’t complain about all these problems at my retirement physical 33 years ago!
    After having close family serving in Iraq and Afghanistan, and seeing some of the problems they come back with, I am not going to pursue my request with an appeal.
    I’m 73 years old, and the good old USA has been good to me when I needed it.
    These young kids now that do 3-4-5 tours back to back in a combat zone, need more help than an old fart like me.
    I just wish that the GOV would accept the fact that many of us in all different fields, were exposed to chemicals and technology that wasn’t understood at the time!

    I don’t want any monetary compensation!
    All I want is my category changed so I don’t have all these co-pay charges!

    • John J. Federico, Jr. says:

      Jake,
      Great post. I served in D-2-44th ADA,( Yoju), 73-74. I was diagnosed with non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma in 2005 and have been in and out of remission. I found it interesting that we used AO at the 38th Bde sites around all the fence lines, but didn’t know it at the time. I have an appeal in progress with the “VA from Hell” concerning exposure to ionizing radiation from warhead ops. Would you be willing to share a copy of the documentation stating AO use at all 38th sites?
      Thanks,
      John

    • Katherine Seamon says:

      Dear Sir,
      Enjoyed reading your comments. My husband also served at Union Lake and a short while at Sea Range before moving on to Camp El Paso. If you have evidence of AO being used at all sites in Korea then I am most interested in reading this. He too suffers from many health issues that I feel came from chemical and radiation exposure.
      I would appreciate your sharing any information with me.
      Katherine V. Seamon

      • John Federico says:

        Katherine,
        Have you ever heard back from Jake regarding his claim to having documentation that Agent Orange was used at Nike Sites in Korea? I contacted him initially and followed up about a month later with no results.
        Sincerely,
        John

  9. ken wagner says:

    Hey guys hows it going? I was a 24k20, taught advanced missile circuitry at Redstone arsenal. I can’t tell you how many times we were exposed or how much but I served in Germany, Hanau and Giessen, then on to Fulda. We had an ICBM in our back yard and it pisses me off that the radar cooked my teeth and god knows what else, and the V.A.’s own hand books now recognize that both ionizing and nonionizing both mess you up, slowly but surely. I asked my primary care why I don’t have full medical, told her about the active problem exposure… and told her the V.A. has our dd214 so why aren’t we automatically given full medical, and do we get monetary benefits for having a shorter life span. Also the doc said the V.A. hospital or someone doesn’t follow their own manual cause she told me to go to the vso office nearest and start my own one man crusade to get the V.A. medical to give veterans exposed to constant RF, Hawk, Nike, etc… the treatment and reward for doing a job that not everyone could do. You did have to be real smart to repair this stuff. V.A., why don’t you give us full medical? I’m not an attorney and I don’t work in your hospital, this should be your job, I already did mine. Anyway guys, if you want to get a hold of me my email is kennethlwagner@yahoo.com

  10. wilson combs says:

    I also was on several Nike missile sites, mostly Okinawa 1958-1960. I probably was exposed to things I had never heard of and as a young soldier did not even think of it. Today I have lung problems, hearing loss, and the only teeth I have missing was pulled at Kadena air base hospital. The VA can not find my records from over there. I was a dog handler K9. If any of my friends remember me they all knew me as Woody Combs.

  11. Chuck Zellers says:

    I served on Nike Ajax/Hercules sites in 1960 thru 1966. I was an ABAR (AN-FPS-75) tech for 3 of those years. During that period of time I developed a bladder tumor and shortly after discharge I devloped a 2nd tumor, both of which were removed without incident. Somewhere I read about RF energy causing such tumors. After charge I did attempt to get VA disability but to no avail. I also read about a lawsuit filed in Germany regarding the whole RF subject. That was some years ago. Never heard more about it.

  12. John Schwegman says:

    I was an IFC operator acq. Radar D battery Mineral Wells, Texas and C battery Alvarado, Texas 1964 – 1967. Lost sense of smell and taste in 1966. Anybody heard of such?

  13. Benjamin Johnson says:

    I served as an MTR operator in South Korea 1969-1970, C Battery 4 th bn 44 Herc artillery. The winters were so cold we would go into the control vans and open the doors to warm up. Were we exposed to radiation by doing that? Also as the MTR operator it was my job to go into the antenna while it was running to run tests on equipment located by the cyclotron tubes, causing me to have direct contact with the radiation. I have been having a lot of thyroid and sleep problems. Could there be a connection?

  14. James Souza says:

    I served in Germany (Zweibrucken) D Battery 2nd Bn 56th ADA, 74 through 76 as an assembly man in the assembly room. Our site was way far from civilization, we needed clearance to get on this site. I can’t find anything on this site, can anyone help? I also have ongoing cancer issues and other problems.

  15. Randy Hillman says:

    Hello out there!!! My father, Frederick R. Hillman (WO1??), served on a site(s) on Long Island. I was very young but do remember visits to Amityville. (at least I think it was. There was a Hawk missile on display at the gate). Also remember watching Herc tests at White sands. As I look over some of this Nike site I do not see any mention or info regarding the Long Island bases. I was wondering if anyone is still out there who remembers working with Dad.
    Of note on the medical side, he developed Hodgekins disease in his early 40’s… had treatments and a remission for about 16 years, then it came back with a vengeance and he passed away at around age 60.(early 90’s)
    Mostly curious at this point. I read that his site was handling nuclear war-heads. I also remember his going on something Mom called “A Status” and he was gone for over a week. Cuban missile crisis??? Give me a shout ghillman14@yahoo.com. Thanks, Randy

  16. Kent Anderson says:

    WOW! In reading the posts from fellow soldiers who served as Nike Hercules Fire Control Operators, I now wonder if the medical issues I’ve encountered had to do with my exposure to radiation. I served at a missile site in Germany in 1970-71 and have had hypertension, a cataract removed and prostate cancer, all of which have happened to others who were exposed. Coincidence? I think not. Seems like the army should be obligated to inform us veterans and do routine follow up diagnostic physicals.

  17. Ralph Dodds says:

    Just stumbled across this site.
    I served in some of the units/battalions mentioned.
    Greetings to some very fine soldiers and men.

    Ralph Dodds
    Major USA
    Ret
    1953-1973

  18. Carlos Perez says:

    I was a 16C (Fire Control Crewman) from 73 thru 76 and developed joint disease especially in my hips. I was told before I was discharged that I would eventually need surgery. They were right as both my hips have been replaced. I also have been experiencing an increasing loss of motor function in my hands (tremors or sometimes called intention tremors). Slowly but surely getting worse. Spent a lot of time in the FC vans as well as on those radars. 24 on and 24 off. Any of my fellow “scope dopes” out there have similar symptoms?

    • Larry Francis says:

      Carlos,

      We all have it. It is called osteomalacia means “soft bones.” Causes all sorts of bone issues. Mine is the removal of two disks between C-5-C6 and C-6-C7. The LOPAR microwaved us and made our bones soft. Try bending an uncooked chicken legbone then put it in the microwave for 2 minutes. The microwaves destroys the cellular mineral matrix in the chickenbone and then it is bendable. Does the same thing to your skeleton.

  19. James Sirmans says:

    Hi, I served in a Nike Hercules site in San Francisco between 1962 and 1964. B-2 51 Ft. Cronkite. I was found to have asbestosis in 1978 and would like to know if anyone else has had any problem with this since the Nike Hercules missiles had asbestos in them and we disassembled them. Can reach me at jesgas2009@att.net. Also if you served with me contact me.

  20. Rich Wilson says:

    Hello, one and all…. I was stationed at a European Nike site – West Germany – with a 16C20 MOS designation. I was working in the IFC area, both in the BC and tracking trailers for just about two (2) years. My ETS was October of 1975 and, at that time, returned stateside. About 25 years later, I had been diagnosed with Neutropenia – the degenerative condition reducing white blood cells to nearly nothing. At one point, three years ago, my neutrophils had been reduce to less than .02 percent. Has any one else experienced the same condition(s), or know of someone in the 16C or 16B MOSs experiencing the same condition(s)?!?! Help!!

  21. I have talked to VA rep. stated we should start a suit. If you think so call me at 1 502 612 2099. Stated class action to make the gov. take action. I have got a JAG officer to look at the case. Please call, we all need help with this. I have tons of reports of ill sick military people… us and other German troops.

  22. Please call me ASAP. Need your help. If we all stay together on this we can make it happen. Just got back out of hospital once more, this time with heart and a bad case of c diff. The missiles and radar made us sick. So please call. I have info from depart. of army and others. I have over 50 letters of sick vets.

    • L.Jewell says:

      Served in Germany 80-82 Nike missile crew member. Developed a pimple on my elbow while there that they said was celutits. 10 years after discharge it came back. After many surgeries no skin will grow in that spot. The VA cannot explain why and wont give me any benefits for the condition, so if you know something that might help let me know. Thanks.

    • conrad zimmerman says:

      Terry…. I am now fighting throat cancer and am getting better. I was a radar operator at several Nike Hercules sites during my 4 year active duty. Most of my service was in HIPAR building and tower. I have filed for VA compensation because I believe the radiation emitted by the klystron assembly caused this cancer. It was serviced by technicians without shutting it down on several occasions by over-riding the interlock when I was in the building and also there certainly was some leakage when it wasn’t being serviced. I am trying to make this as brief as possible but I have more info. Both my throat doctor and radiologist have submitted letters saying they believed the cancer was from prolonged exposure to RF and ionizing radiation. Why doesn’t the VA recognize these cancers as there have been several claims being denied. I know of one class action suit that found for the plaintiffs. Where can I find more evidence to back my claim. Conrad Zimmerman

      • Larry Francis says:

        I was told today by the VA disability people, the only way a registry gets created ( like for atomic vets, LORAN vets, etc, is after a CDC study is ordered by Congress and after a bill is passed in Congress. That is how the Camp Lejeune vets got a registry.

    • Larry Francis says:

      Terry,

      I have just applied for my disability. Nike Herc radar tech 73-76 Navy. Pinecastle electronic warefare range , had a Nike Herc system, LOPAR antenna was 10 yards from the van where I worked as an elevation operator. I need all of your letters to put in my disability file.

      Larry Francis

    • Terry,

      I need copies of the vet letters for my disability case and I want to sue the VA.

  23. Rich Wilson says:

    With respect to all those experiencing a multitude of medical issues, both simple and those extreme, has anyone contacted Congressional or Senate representation for assistance, support and guidance? I would be somewahat alarmed that no one in the Legislative branch is aware of these ongoinig issues with Nike soldiers. Would an independent website – social media – be a good start, e.g., twitter, facebook, instagram, youtube, for attention?!? There is not one attorney or doctor I have contacted that will commit themselves torecognizin the many upon many issues.

    • Larry Francis says:

      Rich,

      I am a network admin by trade and I am considering first a Facebook page and then a separate website.
      Nike Ajax/Hercules Radar System Veterans Health Organization.
      Once I have it up I want everyone to join and tell your stories. This crap about non-ionizing radiation not from the LOPAR not hurting you is not true.

      https://mmrjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40779-017-0139-0

      This is what the DOD is hiding. I have a copy (one week old) of a study the Army did in 1970 about the effects of radar on dogs and monkeys and they deleted it.

      Give me an email address and I can send the pdf to you. It was on the Defense Technical Information website. It was written by GE for the Army.

      Larry

  24. Terry Olliges says:

    As of 4-17-15 received notice that my claim has been turned over to the dept. of defense at Ft. Knox, KY. Waiting to hear intent. We’ll see what happens. will let you know. Have a good weekend.

    • James B. Strunks says:

      Hi Terry: Been doing some web research and was impressed with your work regarding Veterans who were exposed to Nike Hercules Missiles. I am an Army Veteran serving 1965-1968 and was stationed at Montrose Beach Chicago, Ill. I am a colon cancer survivor (Stage III). and have posterior subcapsular cataracts removed which, according to a website I found, both of these conditions can be results of radiation exposure. I have been working with the VA regarding a claim (per their suggestion) and also with State Rep. Mike DeWines office (Dayton, Ohio). At this point they suggest I try to contact any other veterans who serviced at Montrose Beach who have had cancer diagnoses or cataracts to prove an exposure to radiation probably created these problems. Any suggestions on the best way to proceed? Any advice you give would be much appreciated. Thanks again for all you are trying to accomplish.

      • Katherine Seamon says:

        Dear James,
        I was wondering how things were going with your claims since you contacted your state Representative. My husband has very similar issues including cardiovascular and stroke problems. He was denied benefits for agent orange. He served on Nike bases for 3 1/2 years. Any help is appreciated.

        Katherine Valentine

        • Hello, my name is Terry Olliges I have been doing a lot of looking into why I am so sick. After 4 years at a missile site The first 9 months I was sick If you would call me at 1 502 612 2099 I have info that Tom and I put together All persons that worked at the sites were contaminated…

          • Mimi Mitchell says:

            My husband was in 52nd USAAD at Marienheide Germany in 1983-85. He was in a Security Attachment and has health issues. I have been studying, gathering everything. Terry what kind of contamination are you speaking of?

          • Don Mullis says:

            Many veterans who served at Fort McClellan between 1970 and 1999 have been exposed to environmental contaminants and may be eligible for substantial VA benefits.

            NOTICE TO VETERANS WHO SERVED AT FORT MCCLELLAN:
            MANY VETERANS WHO SERVED AT FORT MCCLELLAN WERE EXPOSED TO ENVIRONMENTAL CONTAMINANTS, HERBICIDE AGENTS, AND VARIOUS HAZARDOUS CHEMICAL AGENTS.

            Look the web for the information

      • Tom Bromley says:

        Hi James and Katherine This is not just local issue. People who worked on most of these missle sites are having the same large group of problems. All of you need to let your member of congress know. I am working with mine Jason Smith but have not heard much yet. There is a lot out there if you are a Nike Veteran if you take the time to look it up. I am working with another 16 MOS and we have a lot of info we have turned into the VA waiting for answers. (tombromley1@yahoo.com)

        • Edward Jones says:

          6 Van Buren Place
          White Plains, NY 10603
          914-761- 4859
          wally35@aol.com

          4/57 to 7/57 MOS 230 – Ordnance Electronic (entry) – Co M Sig Sch Ft. Monmouth NJ – Pvt
          7/57 – 11/57 MOS 252.1 Nike Acq. RdR and Comp. Sys Repair – 2nd ETD OGMS Redstone Ars… Pfc

          After OGMS the balance of my active duty was with the 156th Ord Detachment at Ft. Wayne, Detroit Mi.

          11/57 – 1/59 MOS 252.1 Nike Acq Rdr and Comp Repairman – 156th Ord Det Ft Wayne Mi. Sp4

          I worked for Martin Orlando on their Missile Master system10/1959 -1/61.
          The training was at Ft Monmouth NJ, 640 hours long, and conduct by Martin Orlando instructors and completed in 1/1960

          I believe we were one of the earlier classes to be trained to support the FUIF. ( Martin Orlando called it Automatic Data Handling Equipment Maintenance
          During the last week of our training, Martin needed one of us to go to Detroit and fill in
          until the class hired for Detroit finished their training.

          Needless to say I seized the opportunity to return to Detroit to work on the FUIF at familiar Nike sites, and sometimes with people I’d met before.
          I then returned to NYC supporting the FUIF in the area for the remainder of my stay with Martin.

      • James,

        I am using http://www.togetherweserved to try to get ahold of other vets who served with me. My roommate in the Navy who worked on anti-aircraft radar systems did not even make it to 35. Brain tumor killed him at 33.

  25. Terry Olliges says:

    james please call me at your convenience (502-612-2099). I can mail you info on many of the cancers that are caused by the exposure and other information regarding U.S. Military persons that were made sick by these. I have been working with another vet on this issue. I also had cancer (renal cell carcinoma) and have printed information from the department of defence although they still are denying responsibility. I have recently found that it is beneficial to say it was environmental (rather than pinpointing radiation exposure alone) because so many illnesses can be caused by other things as well (i.e., such as radar, missiles, chemicals used for cleaning parts and/or chemicals used to clear the security perimeter).

    • Terry Olliges says:

      to tom from terry went to va today blood count low also have cataracts both eyes like others on the site been fishen more and more each day hope they keep comming thank terry o

  26. Back in hospital blood pressure up down passing out. V.A. hospital states don’t have idea. I gave them some paper work on a toxic hazardous materials normal operation of Nike site trichloroethylene lead trichoroethane propellants acid.mercury nickel arsenic mercury poured into latrines used for weed control incorporation into ground water 10/5 cancer risk over life time confined to personnel who were assigned to Nike sites superfund set up but not for vets if you are a vet the answer is a big no you were the ones that work with this shit every day in the missile sites…I have the proof TCE causes nervour damage liver lung abnormal heartbeat coma death March 26, 2010 superfund Indiana priorities list over 130 million dollars not one dollar to vets renal cell carcinoma number one on the list liver cell carcinomas tumors. Trichoroethylene is a complete carcinogen leads to cancer evidence of damage to the proximal tubule go to missile site clean up sites superfund clean up missile sits.you have been made sick. My little girl born with no hip socks less then one year out of military/there are a lot more cities town getting millions of dollars why are we the vets not being taken care, 10 diff. types of cancers radar acquisition radar HIPAR high power capacitors and transformers were radiation sources. Tube breakages did occur info from U.S. Army hazardous materials agency I have this info Tom shit happens. Please call your congress. V.A. will not help. I went they told me to big of issue for them. If you get sick give your doctors copies of your paper work take time too look it will be to your benefit. If you need help please call me 1 502 612 2099 day or night it will cost you not one penny if you worked with these toxic waste most likely you are going to get sick but I pray that you don’t. God be with you all and be safe good night. Terry O. Tom go catch us some fish ha ha

  27. I have one more thing to say there are 2216 missile sites getting large amounts of moneys epa on there asses

  28. Well got letter today turned down once more by V.A. They are clearly not doing their job tom if you read this call me its a joke been in hospital 12 times need wife too dress me can’t drive V.A. said they would put hand rails walker nurse three days a week but not give me comp. Will go too v.a/rep didn’t not read reports from doctors their is no way thats the people that work for the v.a.turn down claims. Just find a way will not let this GO not just me but a lot of vets in need the people that review need reviewed not doing their jobs i can show they don’t in 5 mins have a nice day Terry O

  29. look up superfund nike missiles clean ups v.a/

  30. back in hospital va bleeding from guts

  31. cases being review by u.s.a congress about sick vets from nike missile

  32. John Federico says:

    Terry,
    A lawyer has advised me that the best way to get action is to elevate it in the public arena via the press. The other approach is to get as many of us vets with like issues and a documented history of on-site service to back up the claim.
    Nike went away quietly and the health issues associated with duty at those site went with it.
    John

    • john if you can call me 1 502 612 2099 I have info on site clean ups and info from u.s.army stateing people working at the sites were exposed, have talked to congress man JOE DONNELLY united states senate phone number 317 226 5555 tom and me are going too meet with a rep from there office I hav 5 years of looking into this I am a ret police officer. have been sick cancer and alot of health problems after my first year at missile and radar site i will be glad too talk with you John please call

  33. mike campbell says:

    I stumbled on this site while researching my fathers military awards and decorations as recorded some years back by my mother. According to her records he was a part of the Order of the Oozlefinch in the late 50s. He was assigned to the 605th AAA Missile Battalion (Nike), 1st and 3rd (Nike-Ajax) Missile Battalions in Danvers, MA, followed by an assignment in Bremerhaven, Germany and finally with the 4th Battalion (Nike-Herc) in El Paso, TX. My father passed away from cancer in 1976, 5 years after retirement and only 1 year after being diagnosed. It is my understanding that there was evidence linking his initial diagnosis to his work with one or more of these units. I wish I had more detail in regards to the medical issues that I could share. If I locate additional medical info that seems pertinent I will share it on the site.

    • Mike terry please call me 1 502 612 2099 i have info for you on health issues and exposer from the sites from the e.p/a/ us dept of the army german military and other militays that used the same systems we all used terry

  34. Mary says:

    I stumbled on to this site. My husband commanded the Nike Site in Wheeler, IN. He had 3 tours in Vietnam and was given 100% disability by the VA. What was his final demise was PANCREATIC CANCER; therefore his 100% disability meant nothing in the end for Survivor Benefits. I am wondering if there are others out there with PANCREATIC CANCER because my “gut” instinct tells me there is a relationship that is being ignored by Congress and the VA.

    • MARY TERRY PLEASE CALL ME AT 1 502 612 2099 I HAVE BRAIN CANCER KINDEY CANCER ARMY STATES OLD AGE AND A LOT OF OTHER REASONS I HAVE PROOF ONE LADY GOT 800000 DOLLERS AND THE GERMAN MILITARY GOT 8000.0000 MARKS IN A LAW SUIT OVER THE RADAR AND MISSILE SITES 15 MILITARY GERMANS FILED A LAW SUIT AND WON I HAVE ALL INFO ON THIS ONLY THE vets ARE THE ONES BEING LEFT OUT ALSO TOLD IF WENT TO A PRIVAT LAWER VA WOULD DRPE THE CASE AND COULD TAKE UP TO 5 YEARS FOR THE MILITARY TO JUST TAKE A LOOK AT THE CASE JUST TAKES MORE TIME MOST OF US WILL BE DEAD I FEEL THEY ARE HOPING FOR THIS TERRY

  35. Richard M. Levine says:

    I worked on the Nike Hercules site on Naha AFB on Naha Okinawa until the end of 1965. One has to realize that as a major AFB, Naha had all kinds of military high-power radars operating on it–what an exposure we must have had. We used to override the chassis interlock to work on the unit that contained the x-ray emitting tubes (what a beautiful purple glow they had). I understand that these tubes should have been designed with lead shields to protect the soldiers. Besides understanding about the failed class-action lawsuit (although the law firm said that I could start my own case if I got cancer), I understood also about the storage use as a herbicide of agent orange on Okinawa, and as a tech my unprotected use of trichloroethylene, not generally known as a carcinogen at the time) to clean circuit boards. Note that although Nike bases have been checked for contamination for a short-list of toxins. Also, as chemicals are later discovered to be dangerous, these sites will require retesting. When I moved to NJ, I visited the East Orange Hospital and had myself put on the agent orange and ionizing radiation registries. Huffington Post had had an excellent article on the class-action lawsuit regarding Nike and Hawk personnel. (I have a copy of the article with some of the conversations, and the letter from the law firm somewhere in my house. I also believe I have a copy of part of a DOD publication recommending a safe distance from Nike radars to avoid detrimental effects of radar exposure, circa 1980.) The law firm had also said that the law suit would have also set up a monitoring class for those who did not already have cancer. If that had been approved outside of the class action status request, I could have received a monitoring benefit. The federal judge did not allow the lawsuit to proceed. I had started a rather lively conversation about these cases within the on-line article. Unfortunately, the Post upgraded their server and deleted the article and the comments. The only condition I have today which might be related is cataracts in both eyes. However, these can not be operated on since I have some unknown condition which irritates my eyes and would make cataract surgery unsuccessful for me. So I suppose if the cataracts get worse I will be blind. Ed Thelen takes the approach to Nike/Hawk veterans are very old now and many people at our age would probably have gotten cancer anyway as a disease of old age. This is probably a valid opinion in some cases, but maybe not in all. I have communicated with Ed for a number of years, and there are many things that we do not agree on. I also understand that the DOD denies presence of agent orange on Okinawa, and that contrary to that the VA has approved a small number of claims regarding it. However, I also believe I read that some of these approved claims may have later been rescinded. Regardless of whether or not the VA believes or approves a claim for compensation, if eligible for VA health care you can still receive treatment for cancer or whatever medical condition you may have, regardless of the cause for free or nominal charges at the VA. The approval of a claim will allow those not otherwise eligible for VA health care to receive medical treatment and monetary compensation. Or those eligible for VA health care to receive monetary compensation.

  36. wayne says:

    Served 6 years in Herc Chicago, Detroit, Alaska as a 16C, also Vietnam and Desert Storm. Had half of one lung removed for cancer, and now may be developing Parkinsons.

  37. I found a book out there called “A Trust Betrayed” by Mike Magner that might shed some light on the TCEs etc that shows different illnesses caused by it. It is about Camp Lejeune but same contaminants that we worked with at the missile and radar sites.

  38. Hello hello well been in and out of the hospital ears eyes not working good bp 217/127 then b/p 56/38 passing out can’t drive cant walk well sometimes sideways. wife is 5′ 4″ and I 6’7″ 370 pounds. She has a hard time. Can’t catch a train. I have talked to four state senators, one US Senator. All stated they were going to look into all of copies of information I sent to some of you. I think maybe we are getting some attention. Been turned down once more. I filed again today. We have a few vets working together on this. If we had a little more weight and a good tug this will work out for a lot of good hard working vets and their families. A lot of people that never even served are getting paid at this time by the US government, have thay looked over someone? Maybe the ones that worked at these sites? I have paperwork by the Dept of Defense stating personnel that worked at the missile bases were exposed. I can send that info. to you if you would like. Just give me a call at 502-612-2099 or email me at tolliges@psci.net. WHERE ARE YOU SUPERFUND? The VETS could use some help too. God Bless.

  39. Don Mullis says:

    Found some information that may help me some. You can look into it if you wish maybe it will help you.

    Chris Attig works at a Law Firm. He said he is a service-connected veteran and a lawer. He runs a web site called;
    VeteransLawBlog.org
    He has a Facebook page.
    Yes he has books to sale.
    you can see some free vidos on
    https//youtube.com/watch?v=twttM6xYOnE
    make sure you look for his name.

  40. Don Mullis says:

    from web site VA.gov
    M21-1, Part IV, Subpart ii, Chapter 2, Section C – Service Connection (SC) for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Environmental Hazards or Service in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN)

    This section contains the following topics:
    Topic Topic Name
    1 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

    2 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Asbestos

    3 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents or Based on Service in the RVN

    4 Payment Under the Nehmer Stipulation for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Herbicides

    5 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Other Specific Environmental Hazards

    6 Claims Based on Participation in the Shipboard Hazard and Defense (SHAD) Project

    7 Claims Based on Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Testing

    Reference: For a list of Military Occupational Specialties (MOSs) with their probability of asbestos exposure, see M21-1, Part IV, Subpart ii, 1.I.3.c.
    The table below describes probability of asbestos exposure by military occupational specialty (MOS).
    Asbestos MOS Handout
    MOS Code Job Title Probability of Exposure
    AA Airman Apprentice Minimal
    ABE Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Launch & Rec Equip) Probable
    ABF Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Probable
    ABH Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Aircraft Handler Probable
    AC Air Traffic Controller Minimal
    ACM Aviation Chief Metalsmith Probable
    ADJ Aviation Machinist’s Mate (Jet Engine Mechanic) Probable
    ADR Aviation Machinist’s Mate Probable
    AE Aviation Electrician’s Mate Probable
    AFCM Aircraft Maintenanceman (Master Chief) Minimal
    AG Aerographer’s Mate Minimal
    AK Aviation Storekeeper Minimal
    AM Aviation Structural Mechanic Probable
    AME Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Probable
    AMH Aviation Structural Mechanic (Hydraulics) Probable
    AMS Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structural) Probable
    AN Airman Minimal
    AO Aviation Ordnanceman Minimal
    AQ Aviation Fire Control Technician Highly Probable
    AR Airman Recruit Minimal
    ARM Aviation Radioman Probable
    AS Aviation Support Equipment Technician Probable
    AT Aviation Electronic Technician Probable
    AW Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator Probable
    AX Aviation Antisub Warfare Technician Probable
    AZ Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Minimal
    B Boilermaker (WWII) Highly Probable
    BU Builder Probable
    BM Boatswain’s Mate Minimal
    BR Boilermaker Highly Probable
    BT Boiler Technician Highly Probable
    CD Construction Driver Probable
    CE Construction Electrician Probable
    CM Construction Mechanic Minimal
    CN Constructionman Probable
    Cox Coxswain Minimal
    CS Commissaryman Minimal
    CT Communication Technician Minimal
    CTR Cryptologic Technician (Collections) Minimal
    DC Damage Controlman Minimal
    DK Disbursing Clerk Minimal
    DP Data Processing Technician Minimal
    DS Data System Technician Minimal
    DT Dental Technician Minimal
    EM Electrician’s Mate Probable
    EN Engineman Probable
    EO Equipment Operator Minimal
    ET Electronics Technician Probable
    FC Fire Controlman Highly Probable
    FN Fireman Highly Probable
    FP Pipefitter Highly Probable
    FT Fire Control Technician Highly Probable
    FTG Fire Control Technician (Guns) Highly Probable
    GM Gunner’s Mate Minimal
    GSM Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Probable
    HC Hospital Corpsman Minimal
    HN Hospitalman Minimal
    HT Hull Maintenance Technician Highly Probable
    IC Interior Communication Technician Probable
    IM Instrumentman Highly Probable
    LI Lithographer Minimal
    M(ME) Metalsmith Minimal
    MA Master-At-Arms Minimal
    MLC Molder Probable
    MM Machinist Mate Probable
    MN Mineman Minimal
    MOMM Motor Machinist Mate Probable
    MR Machinery Repairman Minimal
    MS Mess Management Specialist Minimal
    MT Missile Technician Probable
    MU Musician Minimal
    NC Navy Counselor Minimal
    OM Opticalman Minimal
    OSPC Operations Specialist Minimal
    PC Postal Clerk Minimal
    PH Photographer’s Mate Minimal
    PHM Pharmacist Minimal
    PN Personnelman Minimal
    Prtr Printer Minimal
    PT Photographic Intelligenceman Minimal
    PTR Painter Probable
    QM Quartermaster Minimal
    RD Radarman Minimal
    RM Radioman Minimal
    RN Radarman Minimal
    SA Seaman Apprentice Minimal
    SC Ship’s Cook Minimal
    SD Stewart Minimal
    SF Shipfitter Minimal
    SFM Shipfitter (Metal Smith) Minimal
    SFP Shipfitter (Pipefitter) Minimal
    SH Ship’s Serviceman Minimal
    SK Storekeeper Minimal
    SM Signalman Minimal
    SN Seaman Minimal
    SO Sonarman Highly Probable
    SoM Soundman Highly Probable
    ST Sonar Technician Highly Probable
    STG/SOG Sonar Technician (Surface) Highly Probable
    STS Sonar Technician (Submarine) Highly Probable
    StM Steward’s Mate Minimal
    SW Steelworker Probable
    TA Stewart Apprentice Minimal
    TD Trademan Minimal
    TE Teletype Minimal
    TM Torpedoman’s Mate Probable
    TN Stewardsman Minimal
    UT Utilitiesman Highly Probable
    WT Water Tender Highly Probable
    Y Yeoman Minimal

    Note: This list is not exclusive and exposure may be otherwise demonstrated on review of the claims folder. Each claim based on asbestos exposure must be adjudicated on its own merit with MOS being one consideration in determining whether there was an exposure event.

  41. Carlos Alonso says:

    My name is Carlos Alonso, MOS 52B20. I operated the 250 KWs out of A Battery 2nd Batt. 562 Arty. during 1969-1970, I also pulled maintenance at in the missile site hydraulics and inside the radars.

    I remember working inside one of the radar hydraulics and it started rotating while I was inside. Also I was pulling many hours inside the generators room in which it has asbestos covered cooling, fuel pipes, oil etc… I had to walk to the outside door due that I did not have a SEC clearance to go through the missile consoles.
    My question is, am I a health risk?
    So far VA has check me with Agent Orange (Diabetes 2, Cardiomyopathy Hypertrophy, Ischemia of the heart. They take blood works from me every two or three months to check my A1C glucose count. But they have not checked my lungs and I’m always short of breath, they only base and award on foreign hazard not domestic.
    Any suggestions??

    • Don Mullis says:

      From VA web site.

      M21-1, Part IV, Subpart ii, Chapter 2, Section C – Service Connection (SC) for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Environmental Hazards or Service in the Republic of Vietnam (RVN)

      This section contains the following topics:
      Topic Topic Name
      1 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Ionizing Radiation

      2 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Asbestos

      3 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents or Based on Service in the RVN

      4 Payment Under the Nehmer Stipulation for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Herbicides

      5 SC for Disabilities Resulting From Exposure to Other Specific Environmental Hazards

      6 Claims Based on Participation in the Shipboard Hazard and Defense (SHAD) Project

      7 Claims Based on Chemical Biological Radiological Nuclear and Explosives (CBRNE) Testing

      Reference: For a list of Military Occupational Specialties (MOSs) with their probability of asbestos exposure, see M21-1, Part IV, Subpart ii, 1.I.3.c.
      The table below describes probability of asbestos exposure by military occupational specialty (MOS).

      Note: This list is not exclusive and exposure may be otherwise demonstrated on review of the claims folder. Each claim based on asbestos exposure must be adjudicated on its own merit with MOS being one consideration in determining whether there was an exposure event.

      Asbestos MOS Handout

      MOS Code Job Title Probability of Exposure
      AA Airman Apprentice Minimal
      ABE Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Launch & Rec Equip) Probable
      ABF Aviation Boatswain’s Mate Probable
      ABH Aviation Boatswain’s Mate (Aircraft Handler Probable
      AC Air Traffic Controller Minimal
      ACM Aviation Chief Metalsmith Probable
      ADJ Aviation Machinist’s Mate (Jet Engine Mechanic) Probable
      ADR Aviation Machinist’s Mate Probable
      AE Aviation Electrician’s Mate Probable
      AFCM Aircraft Maintenanceman (Master Chief) Minimal
      AG Aerographer’s Mate Minimal
      AK Aviation Storekeeper Minimal
      AM Aviation Structural Mechanic Probable
      AME Aviation Structural Mechanic (Safety Equipment) Probable
      AMH Aviation Structural Mechanic (Hydraulics) Probable
      AMS Aviation Structural Mechanic (Structural) Probable
      AN Airman Minimal
      AO Aviation Ordnanceman Minimal
      AQ Aviation Fire Control Technician Highly Probable
      AR Airman Recruit Minimal
      ARM Aviation Radioman Probable
      AS Aviation Support Equipment Technician Probable
      AT Aviation Electronic Technician Probable
      AW Aviation Antisubmarine Warfare Operator Probable
      AX Aviation Antisub Warfare Technician Probable
      AZ Aviation Maintenance Administrationman Minimal
      B Boilermaker (WWII) Highly Probable
      BU Builder Probable
      BM Boatswain’s Mate Minimal
      BR Boilermaker Highly Probable
      BT Boiler Technician Highly Probable
      CD Construction Driver Probable
      CE Construction Electrician Probable
      CM Construction Mechanic Minimal
      CN Constructionman Probable
      Cox Coxswain Minimal
      CS Commissaryman Minimal
      CT Communication Technician Minimal
      CTR Cryptologic Technician (Collections) Minimal
      DC Damage Controlman Minimal
      DK Disbursing Clerk Minimal
      DP Data Processing Technician Minimal
      DS Data System Technician Minimal
      DT Dental Technician Minimal
      EM Electrician’s Mate Probable
      EN Engineman Probable
      EO Equipment Operator Minimal
      ET Electronics Technician Probable
      FC Fire Controlman Highly Probable
      FN Fireman Highly Probable
      FP Pipefitter Highly Probable
      FT Fire Control Technician Highly Probable
      FTG Fire Control Technician (Guns) Highly Probable
      GM Gunner’s Mate Minimal
      GSM Gas Turbine System Technician (Mechanical) Probable
      HC Hospital Corpsman Minimal
      HN Hospitalman Minimal
      HT Hull Maintenance Technician Highly Probable
      IC Interior Communication Technician Probable
      IM Instrumentman Highly Probable
      LI Lithographer Minimal
      M(ME) Metalsmith Minimal
      MA Master-At-Arms Minimal
      MLC Molder Probable
      MM Machinist Mate Probable
      MN Mineman Minimal
      MOMM Motor Machinist Mate Probable
      MR Machinery Repairman Minimal
      MS Mess Management Specialist Minimal
      MT Missile Technician Probable
      MU Musician Minimal
      NC Navy Counselor Minimal
      OM Opticalman Minimal
      OSPC Operations Specialist Minimal
      PC Postal Clerk Minimal
      PH Photographer’s Mate Minimal
      PHM Pharmacist Minimal
      PN Personnelman Minimal
      Prtr Printer Minimal
      PT Photographic Intelligenceman Minimal
      PTR Painter Probable
      QM Quartermaster Minimal
      RD Radarman Minimal
      RM Radioman Minimal
      RN Radarman Minimal
      SA Seaman Apprentice Minimal
      SC Ship’s Cook Minimal
      SD Stewart Minimal
      SF Shipfitter Minimal
      SFM Shipfitter (Metal Smith) Minimal
      SFP Shipfitter (Pipefitter) Minimal
      SH Ship’s Serviceman Minimal
      SK Storekeeper Minimal
      SM Signalman Minimal
      SN Seaman Minimal
      SO Sonarman Highly Probable
      SoM Soundman Highly Probable
      ST Sonar Technician Highly Probable
      STG/SOG Sonar Technician (Surface) Highly Probable
      STS Sonar Technician (Submarine) Highly Probable
      StM Steward’s Mate Minimal
      SW Steelworker Probable
      TA Stewart Apprentice Minimal
      TD Trademan Minimal
      TE Teletype Minimal
      TM Torpedoman’s Mate Probable
      TN Stewardsman Minimal
      UT Utilitiesman Highly Probable
      WT Water Tender Highly Probable
      Y Yeoman Minimal

      Note: This list is not exclusive and exposure may be otherwise demonstrated on review of the claims folder. Each claim based on asbestos exposure must be adjudicated on its own merit with MOS being one consideration in determining whether there was an exposure event.

  42. I am writing this post on behalf of my husband Richard J. Martin who was a Nike Hercules Hipar radar operator for the U.S. Army from 1968 to 1972. He would come home with ringing in his ears and would feel tired and exhausted from his job. He would also tell me how there were signs up all over the inside of the Nike Hercules buildings where he worked in over his time in the service that stated “warning high power radar in use”. Well he turned 65 in January of 2015. In June of 2015 he was diagnosed with Anaplastic Thyroid Cancer. The first thing the doctors ask him was, “were you ever exposed to any type of radiation during your youth or early adulthood. He explained his job in the Army as a Nike Hercules radar operator and they immediately told him that this was most likely the cause of his Anaplastic Thyroid cancer. It is the only known cause for this type of cancer. It does not present itself until you are in your 60’s , Rich had just turned 65. The government is denying he was ever exposed to any type of radiation but he worked in those little “shacks” as he called them 24 and 48 hours to include sleeping in them. He said the Klystron tubes when he ran checks were so bright and hummed like bumble bees when he had to open the doors to look in at them he could feel the vibrations off of them. Even if they had to shut them down for a few minutes they still glowed on for awhile. There is no doubt his time spent in the U.S. Army on Nike Hercules bases , to include Wilmington, Oh, Hermanie, Pa. and Germany was definitely the cause of this dreadful and very aggressive Cancer. Anaplastic Thyroid cancer is so rare only 1 to 2% of thyroid cancers are Anaplastic. And it is caused by the altering of DNA from radiation exposure at a young age. How sad. They issued no badges back then, during the Vietnam era or any other protection or way to tell if he was being exposed to harmful radiation. He passed away after only 6 months on Dec. 26th 2015 in the James Cancer Center in Columbus, Ohio. After surgery to remove the fast growing tumor and thyroid, 8 chemo treatments and 33 straight treatments of IMRT radiation. (Interesting Huh? that radiation can cause this yet they use it to try and kill it as well?) I type this in his memory. Wife, Carole

  43. I guess the tubes were also known as Cyclotron tubes.

  44. Gil Dewart says:

    I served at the Pacifica, California site, 1954-56, but am interested in the Red Canyon, New Mexico test facility’s proximity to the Trinity nuclear site. Does anyone know of any possible radiation hazards for those who might have been exposed at that location?

  45. Phil Wogoman says:

    I was at D 1 62, in Grafton, Il. 1961 to late 62, as an MTR operator, and then an instructor in the radar vans at Ft Bliss until discharge in late 64. I remember being told that exposure to the radar emissions could cause either cancer or sterilization. Have 3 great kids so not sterile. I have had bladder cancer 9 years ago, cataracts in both eyes removed, and have joint pain mainly in the knees. I have ringing in my ears also. Having hearing and eyes checked by VA the first of May, and will make sure they understand that I was involved with radar. See what happens.

  46. Don Mullis says:

    Web site is
    civilianexposure.org

    This web site talks about contamination water on Army, Navy, Air Force and USMC bases.

    some of you may wish to check it out because you may have live on the base(s). you may had a wife or kids with you.

    Some US House and US Sente members (PA, NC, VA)are starting to ask question to VA and DOD about contamination water.

    • Don Mullis says:

      The two Florida US Senters have added thgier Congressional support to the contamination water.

      • Don Mullis says:

        some people are starting to look into:
        Ft. ORD, CA
        Naval Station Adak Alaska
        Wurtsmith Air Force Base Oscoda MI
        El Toro Marine Corps Air Station El Toro CA

        • Don Mullis says:

          Something to kept in mind.

          The Pentagon’s own Inspector General documented in a 1999 report pollution at US bases in
          Canada
          Germany
          Great Britain
          Greenland
          Iceland
          Italy
          Panama
          Philippines
          South Korea
          Spain
          Turkey

          In recent week Okinawa, Japan. Camp Kinser and Camp Hansen.

  47. Don Mullis says:

    Web site congress.gov

    Summary: S.901 — 114th Congress (2015-2016)
    Introduced in Senate (04/13/2015)

    Toxic Exposure Research Act of 2015

    Directs the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) to select a VA medical center to serve as the national center for research on the diagnosis and treatment of health conditions of the biological children, grandchildren, or great-grandchildren of individuals exposed to toxic substances while serving as members of the Armed Forces that are related to such exposure.

    Requires: (1) the Department of Defense (DOD) or the head of a federal agency to make available to the VA for review records held by DOD, an Armed Force, or that federal agency that might assist the VA in making determinations regarding individuals and descendents afflicted with a health condition as a result of such exposure; (2) the VA and DOD or such agency head to jointly establish a mechanism for the availability and review of records by the VA; and (3) the national center to employ at least one licensed clinical social worker to coordinate access of individuals to appropriate social and health care programs and to handle case management.

    Establishes an Advisory Board to oversee and assess the national center and to advise the VA regarding the center’s work.

    Directs DOD to declassify documents (other than documents that would materially and immediately threaten national security) related to any known incident in which at least 100 members of the Armed Forces were exposed to a toxic substance that resulted in at least one case of an associated disability.

    Directs the VA to conduct a national outreach and education campaign directed toward members of the Armed Forces, veterans, and their family members to communicate information on: (1) incidents of exposure of members of the Armed Forces to toxic substances, health conditions resulting from such exposure, and the potential long-term effects; and (2) the national center. Requires DOD and the Department of Health and Human Services to assist the VA in implementing such campaign.

  48. Don Mullis says:

    From VA.gov

    Million Veteran Program (MVP)
    MVP is a national, voluntary research program funded entirely by the Department of Veterans Affairs Office of Research & Development. The goal of MVP is to partner with Veterans receiving their care in the VA Healthcare System to study how genes affect health. To do this, MVP will build one of the world’s largest medical databases by safely collecting blood samples and health information from one million Veteran volunteers. Data collected from MVP will be stored anonymously for research on diseases like diabetes and cancer, and military-related illnesses, such as post-traumatic stress disorder

    What is the purpose of the Million Veteran Program?

    The Veterans Affairs (VA) Research and Development program is launching the Million Veteran Program (MVP), an important partnership between VA and Veterans to learn more about how genes affect health, to improve health care for Veterans. In order to do this, MVP will establish one of the largest databases of genetic, military exposure, lifestyle, and health information. Research findings based on MVP may lead to new ways of preventing and treating illnesses in Veterans. Such findings may help answer questions like “Why does a treatment work well for some Veterans but not for others?”; “Why are some Veterans at a greater risk for developing an illness?”; and “How can we prevent certain illnesses in the first place?” With the expected enrollment of one million Veterans over the next five to seven years, MVP aims to be one of the largest databases of its kind in the United States.

    What are genes and how do they affect health?
    Genes determine the color of our eyes and hair, our height, and other personal traits. Through interactions with our environment and various lifestyle factors, genes may also contribute to our risk for disease, including common illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer. In fact, genes may be a critical part of why some people get diseases and others do not. Genes may also affect how we respond to certain medications. Because of their genetic make-up, some people may respond better than others to a particular treatment, or experience different side effects. Overall, a better understanding of how genes work may help to prevent, and improve treatment of, disease. An increasingly common way to gain knowledge about genes and health is to collect genetic samples and health information from large groups of people, and compare which genes are linked to which health traits.

    How does this important research help Veterans?

    Veterans—and in fact all Americans—stand to benefit greatly as researchers learn more about the effects of genes on health. Screening, diagnosis, and treatment for some illnesses—such as some forms of cancer—have already been improved through knowledge about the effects of certain genes. MVP will lead to new knowledge about which genes put people at risk for certain diseases, and which ones affect how people respond to treatment. This knowledge may eventually lead to better treatments and preventive measures for many diseases, including common illnesses such as heart disease, diabetes, and cancer.

    Contact Information

    Whom do I contact for more information about participation in MVP?

    For more information about MVP, visit http://www.research.va.gov/mvp. Or call, toll-free, (866) 441-6075.

    • Albany , NY
    • Albuquerque , NM
    • Atlanta , GA
    • Bay Pines , FL
    • Bedford, MA
    • Birmingham , AL
    • Buffalo , NY
    • Charleston , SC
    • Cincinnati , OH
    • Cleveland , OH
    • Columbia , SC
    • Dallas , TX
    • Durham , NC
    • Gainesville , FL
    • Hampton , VA
    • Hines , IL
    • Houston , TX
    • Indianapolis , IN
    • Iowa City, IA
    • Leavenworth , KS
    • Little Rock , AR
    • Loma Linda , CA
    • Long Beach , CA
    • Los Angeles , CA
    • Louisville, KY
    • Madison , WI
    • Manchester, NH
    • Manhattan , NY
    • Memphis , TN
    • Miami , FL
    • Milwaukee , WI
    • Minneapolis , MN
    • Muskogee, OK
    • Nashville , TN
    • Northampton, MA
    • Northport, NY
    • Orlando , FL
    • Palo Alto , CA
    • Philadelphia , PA
    • Phoenix , AZ
    • Pittsburgh , PA
    • Portland , OR
    • Providence, RI
    • Richmond , VA
    • Salem, VA
    • Salisbury , NC
    • Salt Lake City , UT
    • San Antonio , TX
    • San Diego , CA
    • Seattle , WA
    • Shreveport , LA
    • St. Louis , MO
    • Tampa , FL
    • Togus, ME
    • Tucson , AZ
    • Washington DC
    • White River Junction, VT
    • Worcester, MA

  49. Don Mullis says:

    here is something for you to read and think about were you lived and worked.

    US Military Bases Known To Be Contaminated (ca. 1992)
    (From: Life in the Times)
    The following 59 U.S. military bases were suffering from significant water or soil contamination a year
    ago, according to the Department of Defense’s interpretation of its latest hazardous waste survey. DoD
    officials say not every base suffering such contamination is on the list, because information was not
    available for all bases. The list is based on the latest status report for DoD’s Installation Restoration
    Program.

    The IRP report contains no explanation of the problems at each base, so we asked each service to
    provide details. The Army did so. The Navy Chief of Information refused to help us gather the
    information. Air Force Public Affairs could not provide the information by our deadline, but we will
    publish it as soon as it becomes available. We gathered information on some of these missing bases
    from EPA and a DoD report to Congress on “Superfund” sites. Life in the Times cannot vouch for the
    accuracy or completeness of the information that was provided.

    Army
    Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
    Essentially every land portion of the Edgewood, MD, area (on which a portion of the base is located) Is
    contaminated or potentially contaminated. Monitoring in 1977-78 indicated contamination of surface
    and ground water. Four standby wells were shut down in 1983 due to detected organic compounds. The
    base’s active drinking water supplies come from two off-post sources. Deer Creek and Winters Run,
    unaffected by contamination on base. Fort A.P. Hill, VA. There are three problems. A herbicide
    contaminated the soil near an old pesticide storage building. The soil has been placed in sealed drums.
    Second, herbicide and dioxin Contaminated soil and debris are stored at a base warehouse in 33-gallon
    drums inside sealed 55-gallon drums. A study will be done to recommend an environmentally sound
    method of permanent disposal. Third, the base plans to remove some 70 tons of soil contaminated by
    DDT. The base water comes from a deep aquifer and is not contaminated, the Army says.

    Fort Belvoir, VA
    Several contaminants – benzene, trichloroethylene, chloroform, toluene, ethylbenzene, and 1-2-
    dichloroethane – have seeped from the Building 324 tank farm into an unnamed creek. None of these
    contaminants was detected in surface water at the installation boundary, and no health hazard is
    apparent, the Army, says. Post drinking water comes from the Fairfax County Water Authority.

    Fort Devens, MA
    A sanitary landfill that is a potential source of contamination is being closed. It was used as an open
    burning site, then for incineration of waste and burial of residues. Water quality meets state
    standards.

    Fort Dix, NJ
    Nine potentially contaminated sites are known. One, the sanitary landfill, was placed on the National
    Priority (Superfund) List due to the presence of organic solvents. However, the Army says no
    significant health hazards have been identified. To avoid any risk, the landfill may be capped with
    clean soil and vegetated with grass. The other eight sites were identified only recently. Organic
    solvents and/or petroleum products were located at an old magazine area, a tank farm, a fire station,
    the golf course, a motor pool, a firing range, a pesticide storage building, and a National Guard facility.
    Investigation is under way to determine any problems. The sites to not endanger the base water supply
    according to the Army.

    Fort Lewis, WA
    There are two problems: One, is Landfill No. 5. Plans call for a landfill liner and leachate collection to
    preclude ground water contamination. There are also plans for a refuse-fired incinerator to reduce
    reliance in the landfill. Also trichloroethylene (TCE) has been found in the ground water beneath the
    Logistics Center. Post drinking water comes from a spring unrelated to that aquifer.

    Fort McClellan, AL
    Ten old training areas and three former disposal sites have a slight chance of subsurface
    contamination from mustard agent and its breakdown products and possible byproducts of chemical
    agent decontamination. Only very small quantities of agent were used and all sites have been closed,
    decontaminated and fenced. No evidence of any surface or surface water contamination has been found
    in the past, the Army says. The post receives its water from the city of Anniston.

    Redstone Arsenal, AL
    A $30 million cleanup was recently completed by Olin Corp, which made DDT in a leased factory that
    was closed in 1970 for environmental reasons. Manufacturing waste was contaminating soils and
    streams. DDT was found in the wildlife food chain but not in potable water supplies inside or outside
    the base. In addition, the presence of PCBs. heavy metals, while phosphorous and other organic
    compounds is known or suspected. An investigation is under way to determine if they contaminated
    the active sanitary landfill, a DDT waste landfill, open burning and detonation grounds, and 22 old
    disposal sites. Also, a $5 million program is in progress to remove all asbestos from post buildings.

    Navy
    Brunswick NAS, ME
    A study is under way to determine contaminants and their migration habits.
    Lakehurst Naval Air Engineering Center, NJ
    Soil and shallow ground water at the tetraethyl lead disposal site are contaminated, perhaps from
    aviation fuel. The ground water in some areas is covered with a 6-inch layer of JP-Fuel. Elsewhere, the
    carcinogen nitronomine may be present. Waste oils, battery acid, and solvents are suspected of having
    been discharged into some dry wells. The soil stabilization field test received 362 gallons of aniline and
    161 of furfural (toxic by ingestion, inhalation, or skin absorption), and ferric choride solution; personnel
    and animals that come in contact with the soil may be endangered. A landfill received thousands of
    gallons of hydraulic fluids, five tons of asbestos, and also cutting oils, solvents, sludge. and heavy
    metals. A site for PCB testing and storage is near the environmentally sensitive Ridgeway Branch. The
    western portion of the base may be contaminated by ordnance: shells, gas-loaded projectiles, phosgene,
    phosphorus, mustard agent, explosives, flares, and depth bombs. The shallow aquifer in this area may
    also be contaminated.

    Moffett Field NAS, CA
    The major contaminants in the ground water are volatile organic compounds.

    Whidbey Island NAS, WA
    The ground water could be contaminated. Waste oil, solvents, fuel, and caustic rinse water containing
    heavy metals have been discharged through the storm sewer system and into Dugella Bay. Waterfowl
    and fish that feed or live in drainage’s may be affected. Subsurface migration at the seaplane base may
    have affected fish or shellfish in Oak and Crescent Harbors. A backup well at Ault Field is threatened
    by potential migration of contaminants.

    Other Navy bases:
    China Lake, CA
    Indian Head NOS, MD
    Jacksonville NAS, FL
    Miramar NAS, CA
    Pabmont River NAS, MD
    Roosevelt Roads NS, Puerto Rico

    Air Force

    Castle AFB, CA
    On-base drinking water supply has been contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). Work is under
    way to install a new well drawing from a deeper, uncontaminated aquifer.
    Dover AFB, DE
    Ground on the is contaminated with arsenic and other metals, and a stream on base is contaminated
    US Military Bases Known To Be Contaminated (ca. 1992) 20100326 3
    with trichloroethylene (TCE). The base well, however, is free of these contaminants. Remedial action
    has been under way since 1985.

    Griffiss AFB, NY
    Phenols, ethyl benzene, and benzene have been detected in ground water on base, and toulene in
    surface water on base.

    Hill AFB, UT
    Seepage water near two disposal areas contains toxic organic chemicals, such as trichloroethylene
    (TCE), 1-2 dichloroethane, and 1,1,1 trichlorethane. None of the affected water is used for human
    consumption. Remedial action to date includes construction of a slurry wall and landfill covers as well
    as pumping and treating contaminated ground water.

    Mather AFB, CA
    Water in 36 homes was affected by trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination of a well on base. A new
    permanent water supply is to be provided to these homes.

    McChord AFB, WA
    Various chemicals — methylene chloride, chloroform, benzene, arsenic, chromium, and mercury — have
    been detected in test wells and in surface drainage leaving the base. One site is a liquid waste spill
    next to the wash rack and industrial waste treatment system. Contracted work for the American Lake
    Gardens Water Supply Project began in 1985; a contractor installed shallow wells and one deep well.

    McClellan AFB, CA
    An estimated 160 sites have been identified. Contaminants include organic compounds, such as
    trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride, and 1-1 dichloreythlene. Wells both on and off base that
    had contaminants exceeding government standards have been shut down. McClellan is considered a
    leader in cleanup efforts. Completed projects include alternate water supply for off base residents and
    a ground water containment system and treatment plant.

    Norton AFB, CA
    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in concentrations exceeding state drinking water standards. All
    base wells were contaminated to various degrees with silver and tetrachlorethylene (PCE). Closure of a
    lagoon and sludge removal was begun several years ago.

    Robins AFB, GA
    Contaminants include halogenated solvents, heavy metals, pesticides (DDT, chordane, etc.), cyanide,
    and oil products. The toxic organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)
    have been detected in ground water on base. Ground water is not used as drinking water, but the
    contaminants could eventually appear in surface water.

    Tinker AFB, OK
    Some base wells were closed due to contamination from chlorinated solvents. Chlorinated solvents
    were also detected in the aquifer that is the primary water source in the region. Organic compounds
    have been detected at all sites, though migration is limited. Remedial action begun in 1984, includes
    capping landfill No. 6, and stopping leaks from underground storage tanks at the fuel farm.

    Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio
    Fourteen organic compounds, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in
    relatively high quantities have been found in wells serving the base. Nearly half the 17 wells have
    been shut down due to contamination or age. An air stripper has been put on two wells to remove the
    organics, and installation of two other strippers is planned.

    Other Air Force bases:

    Beale AFB, CA
    Chanute AFB, IL
    Charleston AFB, SC
    Columbus AFB, MS
    Edwards AFB, CA
    England AFB, LA
    F.E. Warren AFB, WY
    George AFB, CA
    Hanscorn AFB, MA
    Hickam AFB, HI
    Kelly AFB, TX
    Lowery AFB, CO
    Luke AFB, AZ
    Kirtland AFB, NM
    Langley AFB, VA
    MacDill AFB, FL
    McGuire AFB, NJ
    Moody AFB, GA
    Mountain Home AFB, ID
    Otis AG Base, MA
    Pope AFB, NC
    Pease AFB, NH
    Plattsburgh AFB, NY
    Reese AFB, TX
    Seymour Johnson AFB, NC
    Shemya, AK
    Travis AFB, CA
    Vandenburg AFB, CA
    Wurtsmith AFB, MI

    http://www.va.gov – Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Web Site
    http://www.va.gov/hepatitusc – VA ‘Hepatitus-C’ Web Site

  50. Don Mullis says:

    Think about were you lived and worked/

    Pollution ‘Hot Spots’ Taint Water Sources
    TOXIC WASTE: A Federal Failure. Second in a series. NEXT: As many military bases in the United States prepare to close, a dispute simmers over how to pay for the pollution they will leave behind.

    June 18, 1990|JOHN M. BRODER | TIMES STAFF WRITER

    HEIDELBERG, West Germany — The U.S. military services have only recently begun to take stock of pollution at bases abroad, so it’s impossible to compile a comprehensive list of the military’s worst overseas “hot spots.”
    But because of German sensitivity to environmental matters and American plans to close scores of excess military facilities here, a clearer picture of the extent of the problem has emerged in West Germany than anywhere else in the world.

    Based on Defense Department documents and numerous interviews with U.S. officials in Europe and Washington, the following sites stand out as the most serious known cases of contamination in West Germany:

    Rhine-Main Air Base: West German contractors doing exploratory work last year for expansion of the passenger terminal at the large U.S. air base near Frankfurt discovered a massive and fast-spreading plume of jet fuel contaminating the subsurface water table. The source was leaking underground fuel tanks and pipelines. A soil and water decontamination operation is under way, which West German officials expect to take at least five years and $15 million to complete.

    Bitburg Air Base: The base for years polluted the Kyll River and feeder streams with organic waste, chemicals and solvents because of inadequate sewage treatment facilities. The Air Force completed a new treatment plant last year in response to protests from West German authorities. The base’s underground fuel system has been 90% replaced after extensive leaks in tanks and pipelines. An unused Matador missile site controlled by the base is known to be contaminated, but there is no money to clean it up, base officials said. The 100-meter by 200-meter site is fenced and abandoned, awaiting cleanup funds.

    Mannheim: The motor pool area at Taylor Barracks in Mannheim is at the top of the Army’s most-polluted list in West Germany. Trichloroethylene and other chlorinated hydrocarbons used as solvents for cleaning military vehicles leached into the water table and were found by West German officials as part of a drinking water surveillance program. A pump-and-treat operation is under way to clean the underground aquifer. Cleanup costs will be at least $10 million over a seven-year period.

    Germersheim: During highway construction at this town near Karlsruhe, West German engineers discovered a one-inch thick layer of heavy oil sitting atop the subsurface water table. The oil was traced to a leaking heating oil tank inside the fence line of a U.S. Army depot. Investigation discovered a 265,000-gallon spill, three-quarters of which had migrated outside the U.S. facility. So far, $9 million has been spent on cleanup, but much more work remains on clearing away contaminated soil and treated the polluted aquifer.

    Mainz Army Depot: Mainz is one of a handful of major repair depots in Europe, where tanks, armored personnel carriers and heavy trucks are stripped down and cleaned, using a variety of powerful chemical solvents. The facility generated tons of industrial wastes, some of which are known to have contaminated ground water supplies. The Army considers it one of its most serious pollution problems, but tests have not yet determined the full extent of contamination.

    Bad Kreuznach: A dry cleaning plant at the Army’s Rose Barracks leaked toxic and carcinogenic chemicals into drinking water supplies for 25 years. Four civilian employees, including one American, were indicted by the West Germans for ground-water contamination after the pollution was discovered in 1986. Cleanup costs are about $130,000 a year now, but U.S. officials would not predict the final cost of remediation. “Bad” in German means “spa”–“and when the water well is polluted it’s real bad for business,” said Robert E. Dunn, chief of the foreign law branch at the Army’s Judge Advocate General’s office in Europe.

    Wurzburg: Another Army dry cleaning plant here is known to have contaminated the underground water table.

    Grafenwohr and Hohenfels: Landfills at these two major American military exercise centers are suspected of containing a variety of dangerous wastes, including unexploded rifle and artillery ammunition. Numerous other landfills on U.S. bases in West Germany and around the world are similarly thought to be potentially serious sites of soil and water contamination. “In years past, some (dangerous) things were not viewed as hazardous and were dumped in landfills,” said Maj. Gen. Bill Ray, the Army’s chief of engineers in Europe. “Any dumps built before 1975 were nothing more than holes in the ground.”

    A Toxic Trail Here are the most serious known cases of pollution caused by the U.S. military in West Germany.

  51. Don Mullis says:

    think about were you worked and lived

    U.S. Military Leaves Toxic Trail Overseas
    TOXIC WASTE: A Federal Failure. Second in a series. NEXT: As many military bases in the United States prepare to close, a dispute simmers over how to pay for the pollution they will leave behind.

    June 18, 1990|JOHN M. BRODER | TIMES STAFF WRITER

    ROHL, West Germany — The United States’ far-flung network of overseas military bases, operating in secret and far outside the reach of American environmental regulation, has left a quagmire of chemical contamination all around the globe that will cost billions of dollars to correct and will damage American foreign policy interests for years to come.

    And, while the problem of toxic waste dumps created at home by industrial polluters has received high-level government attention, the very existence of a huge problem overseas is almost unknown outside the Pentagon.

    For years, the brook that runs through this small village just beyond the runways of Bitburg Air Base has been a dumping ground for unwanted jet fuel, chemical solvents and firefighting chemicals.

    Other U.S. military installations have polluted the drinking water of the Pacific island of Guam, poured tons of toxic chemicals into Subic Bay in the Philippines, leaked carcinogens into the water source of a German spa, spewed tons of sulfurous coal smoke into the skies of Central Europe and pumped millions of gallons of raw sewage into the oceans.

    Even as they defended the freedom and security interests of the United States and its allies, America’s armed forces have bequeathed to their hosts another legacy as well, one of enduring environmental damage.
    “The Department of Defense is not blameless,” conceded David J. Berteau, the senior civilian Pentagon official in charge of environmental programs. “There (are) places where we have not lived up to our responsibilities. We’ve done some dumb things in the disposal of hazardous materials.”

    Today, with the Pentagon preparing to close scores of costly foreign bases because of a deepening budget crunch and easing world tensions, the bill for decades of careless and arrogant environmental behavior is coming due.

    And the tab will be paid not only in billions of dollars in cleanup costs but also in strained relations with many of America’s most valued allies.

    Indeed, Army and Air Force officials in West Germany have warned that U.S. military officers or civilian employees face “the specter of criminal charges, especially concerning ground-water pollution.” Such charges have already been brought in West Germany and Italy, where prosecutors have charged civilian employees of the U.S. military with illegal disposal of hazardous chemicals.

    As the world’s most extensive industrial enterprise, the military generates huge quantities of hazardous wastes–used oils and solvents, paint sludges, plating residues, heavy metals, asbestos, cyanide, PCBs, battery acid, pesticides, herbicides and virtually every other toxic substance known to man. American military power plants in Europe also have caused significant air pollution and acid rain by burning high-sulfur content coal imported from the United States, a result of congressional action in the 1970s to help the faltering American soft-coal industry.

    Lethal Waste Piles Up

    The Pentagon also creates such special classes of lethal byproducts as high-level radioactive wastes from atomic weapons plants, high explosive powder, outdated chemical weapons, rocket fuels and ordnance practice ranges full of unexploded bullets, bombs and artillery shells.

    In addition, the 2 million men and women in uniform and 1 million civilian Pentagon employees stationed in the U.S. and around the globe daily produce tons of ordinary garbage, medical wastes, photographic chemicals and as much sewage as a large city.
    By the Pentagon’s own admission, much of this waste has been treated cavalierly both in the United States and abroad. A seven-year survey of 1,579 domestic bases found 14,401 sites of known and suspected contamination, including 87 that qualify for inclusion on the Superfund list of the most polluted places in America. Cleaning up the messes at U.S. bases will cost at least $20 billion, and perhaps as much as $200 billion, according to Defense Department estimates.

    The Pentagon has not even begun to assess the scope of the problem at foreign facilities, fearing the staggering cost of cleanup and the wrath of allies.

    While there is no systematic effort under way to determine how badly polluted America’s overseas bases are, the Army–without even looking formally–has identified 300 contaminated sites in West Germany alone. Of the total, 30 are on bases slated for closure and 25 are currently deemed serious enough to require expensive long-term remedies.

    Polluted Sites Known

    The Air Force has acknowledged that it has polluted soil, streams or ground water at every one of its airfields in Europe.
    The Navy says it does not know the extent of contamination at its many overseas bases because it has neither money nor a legal requirement to study the problem. The Navy’s senior environmental officer conceded that the service is aware of a number of polluted sites worldwide but refused to identify them because, he said, it would create “problems with host nations.”

  52. Don Mullis says:

    Think about were you worked and lived.

    Overseas Military Bases and Environment
    The United States operates a vast array of foreign bases manifesting many of the same environmental problems found at domestic bases, including toxics in drinking water, explosives on firing ranges, and noise pollution.

    by John Lindsay-Poland and Nick Morgan
    Key Points

    • The U.S. lacks a comprehensive program for responding to environmental contamination at foreign military bases.

    • Operating without clear legal obligations, the Pentagon has chosen to implement the most minimal environmental program possible.

    • Shrouded in secrecy, DOD has avoided oversight and criticism of its existing programs, which are administered by well-intentioned staff in a haphazard, inconsistent, and underfunded manner.

    The United States operates a vast array of foreign bases manifesting many of the same environmental problems found at domestic bases, including toxics in drinking water, explosives on firing ranges, and noise pollution. At domestic bases, the Department of Defense (DOD) has undertaken a rigorous and public—if inadequate—cleanup program. Overseas, DOD hides behind a veil of secrecy and refuses to clean up most contamination generated by its activities. In Congress, the military’s funding for overseas environmental programs has been subject to a kind of reverse pork-barreling. In the absence of constituents who are directly affected, cleanup obligations are frequently ignored.

    DOD’s overseas bases include some 800 locations ranging in size from radio relay sites to major airbases. Technological advances and the end of the cold war have led to downsizing of many overseas bases. In Germany, alone, the U.S. withdrew 180,000 troops between 1990 and 1995.

    Most overseas military base agreements were signed prior to the current era of environmental awareness and, accordingly, contain extremely vague environmental provisions, if any. Before the 1980s, the military kept few records of the exact amounts or locations where toxics and explosives were used. That is why, even at domestic bases, extensive study is often needed to discover and characterize hazards.
    Extensive environmental legislation governs domestic bases, but no legislation focuses on overseas bases. DOD has exploited this lack of explicit obligation by conducting the absolute minimum of environmental restoration at overseas bases. Although the military’s environmental compliance overseas has improved in recent years in areas such as recycling, toxics disposal, and sewage treatment, its response to sites contaminated in the past has been characterized by a secretive, do-nothing approach.

    The U.S. military has left behind a legacy of environmental problems throughout the world, giving rise to a multitude of complaints by host governments, community groups, and environmental organizations. In the Philippines, only after the U.S. military evacuated Subic Naval Station and Clark Air Base in 1992 did Filipinos discover what one U.S. official called a “horror story,” including tons of toxic chemicals dumped on the ground and into the water, or buried in uncontrolled landfills. In Panama, 21 people already have died from explosions of ordnance left on firing ranges, prompting fears that more accidents will occur after the U.S. leaves. And in Germany, where half of all overseas U.S. troops are still stationed, industrial solvents, firefighting foams, and waste have destroyed local ecosystems near some military bases. The Army estimates that cleanup of all U.S.-caused soil and groundwater pollution overseas could cost more than $3 billion.

    Although the Pentagon has issued numerous statements regarding environmental protection overseas, no U.S. legislation addresses or regulates such protection. The current overseas remediation policy, promulgated by DOD in October 1995, is far weaker than domestic law. For example:

    • Overseas base cleanup has no program element in the federal budget, limiting military commanders to efforts paid out of each installation’s operations and maintenance accounts, even if they want to do more.

    • The policy does not require baseline studies to discover hazardous sites.

    • The policy only addresses sites where DOD already knows of problems.

    • DOD is obligated to remediate only “imminent and substantial” endangerments. More extensive cleanup may occur if it is deemed necessary to maintain military operations, to protect human health and safety (if required by international agreements), or if funded by the host country.

    • DOD will not fund any remediation after a facility has been returned to the host country unless required by a binding international agreement or a cleanup plan negotiated before the transfer. In contrast, at domestic bases requiring remediation, cleanup almost always continues after closure.

    In addition to the 1995 policy, DOD is required by Executive Order 12114 (signed in 1979) to produce environmental assessments for actions overseas that affect the environment. Yet the U.S. has spent only $102 million on overseas base cleanups during the last four years versus $2.13 billion budgeted in 1998 alone for domestic base cleanups. In an attempt to minimize further expenditures, DOD is undermining its declared commitment to make the U.S. military a global environmental leader.
    Problems with Current U.S. Policy
    Key Problems

    • By limiting cleanup to known, imminent, and substantial dangers and by excluding cleanup after bases close, DOD environmental policy for overseas bases does not meet moral and international legal standards.

    • Communities and host nations affected by DOD’s overseas toxics have no input into how cleanup decisions are made.

    • Both the military contamination and the double standard applied to cleanup harm U.S. relations with other governments and peoples.

    There are several fundamental problems with DOD’s response to the contamination it has caused at overseas military bases. Since there is no domestic legislation requiring the Pentagon to clean up its overseas sites, its response is dictated by existing international agreements, which are generally vague, and by DOD’s own flawed 1995 policy. At the root of the problem, however, is the U.S. military’s belief that the mere presence of overseas forces, combined with investments in overseas base infrastructure, more than compensates host nations for the financial burdens of DOD’s overseas toxic legacy.

    Although the U.S. has spent billions of dollars to develop and maintain overseas bases, the Pentagon applies a double standard in its domestic and overseas cleanup programs. Congress has contributed to DOD’s minimalist approach by failing to direct a coherent response. As such, DOD’s first overseas cleanup policy lagged behind similar domestic policies by 24 years. Domestically, the Pentagon found that early and accurate identification of toxic sites was an essential component of its program. In contrast, DOD’s overseas policy fails to require a comprehensive review for all potential sites and waives all obligation to clean up hazardous sites unless they pose “imminent and substantial” endangerment.
    Since it does not search for hazardous overseas sites, the Pentagon cannot evaluate whether such sites warrant cleanup. In Panama, DOD is turning over bases to the government (prior to the treaty-imposed December 31, 1999 deadline) without providing accurate inventories of scores of sites contaminated with fuel, lead acid from discarded batteries, and other toxins. So despite being in compliance with its own policy, DOD is still transferring pollution to host countries.

    The U.S. military believes that the health impacts of pollution are offset by the value of improvements that have been made to overseas bases, implying that the health of foreigners is worth less than the health of Americans. Though infrastructure developments may be important, countries may not have the technical or financial resources to clean up after DOD leaves. Furthermore, given that a single hazardous site can cost as much as $100 million to restore, the cleanup of a large base could easily exceed the value of any residual infrastructure improvements. Thus, if DOD conducted a full investigation of its contamination, the U.S. could owe its host country a substantial sum of money.
    Unfortunately, except for bases in northern Europe, the Pentagon is not making any effort to accurately define the status of sites being transferred to foreign countries. When bases closed in the Philippines in 1992, DOD made every effort to avoid identifying problems. There are some environmentally committed base commanders and staff, but there is no mandate for their efforts. Nor is there a budgetary program element, so funding has to complete with other core operations and maintenance needs.

    When environmental staff do conduct cleanups, it is often without input from host governments and always without consulting affected communities. Rather than building trust, as it has attempted domestically over the last few years, the Pentagon has avoided all public discussion overseas. DOD’s isolation from the overseas public and from some host governments invites political controversy whenever major sites are discovered. Members of the public, legislators, and agency representatives in Iceland, Germany, Italy, Okinawa, Panama, the Philippines, and Puerto Rico have expressed frustration with DOD’s cleanup program. Anger over environmental impacts undermines constructive relations with foreign countries both large and small.
    The current policy also fails to set criteria for assessing imminent threats or for selecting adequate cleanup levels. In this void, DOD personnel in each country draw upon a mix of professional judgment, advice of contractors, and domestic environmental laws. As a result, DOD is likely wasting precious resources by cleaning up sites that are not a priority to the host country and by conducting incomplete clean-ups that host countries may find inadequate at a later time.

    Failure to assess and clean up contamination also violates international norms requiring governments to ensure that their actions do not harm other individuals or countries. Yet Washington exploits imbalances in political and economic power by rewarding countries that develop aggressive regulatory programs and punishing those without sufficient resources or technical capacities. Global peers (such as Japan and Germany) are able to force the U.S. to clean up its toxic messes, whereas little or no cleanup occurs in less developed countries, which have neither the resources and the technology to redeem the toxic bases nor the clout to force DOD to do so.

    Finally, the Pentagon’s practice of leaving contaminated bases behind violates the generally accepted principle that the polluter pays. This principle is being codified by an increasing number of countries and is already the law within the United States. In a cynical twist on the principle, Pentagon policy allows host countries to pay for cleanups of U.S. base pollution if they are unsatisfied with DOD’s lack of action, as long as the cleanup does not interfere with military operations.

    Toward a New Foreign Policy
    Key Recommendations

    • Environmental information should be made available to the public in host nations.

    • DOD overseas cleanup standards should be on a par with U.S. domestic standards and consistent with international law.

    • When closing its overseas bases, the U.S. should negotiate post-closure cleanup agreements that allow for reasonable continuing obligations.

    In light of these problems, the U.S. should draft a new overseas cleanup policy that eliminates double standards and is consistent with domestic cleanup requirements. Such a policy would not only comply with international law and make the U.S. a more gracious guest on foreign soil, it would also set a better environmental example for other nations, for international agencies, and for transnational corporations.
    A vital first step toward this new policy would be to disclose to affected nations and communities all documents relevant to the environmental conditions of current and former U.S. bases. Such documents should include comprehensive environmental assessments, which is standard procedure for domestic military bases. Documents could be deposited with libraries or universities with public access and delivered to pertinent host government agencies.

    Second, cleanup standards overseas should be on a par with U.S. domestic standards and consistent with international law.
    Domestically, DOD is forced to comply with the Superfund law and its mechanisms for establishing safe levels of contamination. If all human health is equally valuable, these standards should apply overseas in countries that do not have explicit definitions for cleanup levels.

    The basis for such international application includes the 1972 Stockholm Convention on the Human Environment, which declares: “States have, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations and the principles of international law…, the responsibility to ensure that activities within their jurisdiction or control do not cause damage to the environment of other States or of areas beyond the limits of national jurisdiction.” Even more pertinently, the UN World Charter for Nature states: “Military activities damaging to nature shall be avoided…. All persons, in accordance with their national legislation, shall have the opportunity to participate, individually or with others, in the formulation of decisions of direct concern to their environment, and shall have access to means of redress when their environment has suffered damage or degradation.”

    These international agreements form an important body of international norms, which assume the status of international law. Since the U.S. is a signatory to these agreements, all federal agencies, including DOD, are subject to these international norms. International law, including the United Nations Charter, also establishes the undisputed human right to freedom from discrimination. Both this provision and common decency dictate that the U.S. should not set a higher cleanup standard for its own citizens than for those of other nations affected by contamination produced by U.S. military activities.

    When closing its overseas bases, the U.S. should negotiate post-closure cleanup pacts with host nations that allow for reasonable continuing obligations, like agreements frequently negotiated with domestic state and local agencies. This is especially important both because cleanup often takes years to complete and because emerging technology can make future cleanup feasible, even though it may not be practical today. In addition, current liability restrictions specifying “known” dangers at foreign bases evade responsibility for potentially serious problems discovered after the U.S. military has left.

    Overseas negotiations should be based on reliable estimates of cleanup costs, not simply a congressional desire to obtain “residual value” for property “improvements.” U.S. estimates of the residual value of military real estate often bear no relation to the cost of adapting military installations to civilian use.
    But the Pentagon cannot undertake such a major policy decision in a vacuum. Congress bears equal responsibility in setting cleanup objectives and ought to consider cleanup as one of DOD’s fundamental responsibilities. As such, it is incumbent on Congress to authorize and fund the Pentagon’s efforts. Until it does so, there will be little chance for DOD’s environmental program to foster constructive relations with other countries or even to meet minimum legal and moral standards.
    Finally, some military activities—such as munitions testing and exercises as well as war itself—are intrinsically harmful to the natural world and inimical to sustainable development. Once judged necessary to contain a perceived Soviet threat, U.S. military bases overseas must be reexamined, and resources should be redirected toward environmental cleanup and other pressing social needs.

  53. Don Mullis says:

    Is Jet Fuel Another Agent Orange? Part One: Exposure

    June 10, 2014/in General /by Chris Amidon, Veterans Advocate

    JP-4 Jet fuel was everywhere in Vietnam. Air Force veterans joke that you know you were in the Air Force when you know what jet fuel tastes like. Huey crews often wiped down their choppers and equipment with JP-4, soldiers would use it to burn trash and feces, and many were chronically exposed to fumes and fuel on their skin. Jets and Huey’s burned it constantly, and there were many instances of large quantities of JP-4 catching fire. In Bien Hoa, in May 1965, 250,000 gallon bladders of JP-4 jet fuel went up in smoke, killing and wounding many troops, and filling lungs with burning fuel.

    In “Vietnam: Lessons Learned #74,” a report on defoliation techniques declassified in 1985, it is mentioned twice:

    “Where defoliation by hand spray must be done near crops or other desirable vegetation, contaminated Jp-4 or diesel fuel should be used without the addition of the herbicide.”

    “[Agent] ORANGE should be mixed with 10 to 20 parts of Jp-4 or diesel fuel (contaminated fuel is acceptable)”

    While only tangentially related to jet fuel, in the document is the single greatest paragraph to demonstrate the oxymoronic nature of the phrase “Military Intelligence:”
    “All these herbicides [including AO] present low risks to humans and animals. They have been widely used in the US for more than 20 years on food and other crops, rangeland, and forests. No special precautions are needed by air or ground crews and friendly troops are often sprayed without ill effects. None of the herbicides is persistent in soil, and areas must be resprayed periodically to kill regrowth, if the tactical situation requires it.”
    “Operation Flyswatter” was a mosquito eradication program in which 1.76 million gallons of malathion pesticide was dusted over the heads of troops, typically right around dusk, when the mosquitos were active, and the men were eating chow below. Many veterans who worked with the project claim that JP-4 or diesel fuel was also often mixed with the pesticides. This makes sense, as pesticides had been routinely mixed with kerosene for a half-century before Vietnam.
    Every veteran who set foot in Vietnam is presumed to have Agent Orange exposure, but shouldn’t they be presumed to have JP-4 exposure as well?

    JP-4 is similar to kerosene, and is what’s known as a “wide-cut” fuel. This means that there are a broader range of constituent components than in commercial fuel or gasoline, and it is cheaper to produce. According to the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, there are typically around 100 hydrocarbon-based components alone.

    Benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene and xylenes, known collectively as BTEX, are extremely toxic to humans, and have become a major environmental problem, especially around Air Force Bases. Hill Air Force Base in Utah was designated as an EPA superfund site, after it was discovered to have JP-4 contamination so extensively that BTEX concentration of 5,000 mg/kg up to 95 feet below the surface. For reference, OSHA considers doses above .004 mg/kg to be harmful to humans. Hill AFB is not alone. Luke, Mather, George, Travis, Williams, McClellan, Tyndall, Griffis, Ellsworth, Anderson, and many more Air Force Bases are on the EPA’s Superfund list, either for BTEX, PCBs, Trichloroethylene, or other contamination. Are we to believe that dangerous levels of these chemicals exist 100 feet below the surface (as well as in the groundwater at many locations), but that Airmen on the surface are not exposed? Even a cook or an information management specialist is being exposed, simply by existing on base.

    It would appear that JP-4 was so ubiquitous in Vietnam-era military operations that nearly every veteran had some exposure. It would even appear that modern-day soldiers, sailors and airmen are still being exposed from JP-4 environmental contamination on military bases, years after the military moved on from JP-4 in 1995 to JP-5, JP-7, and JP-8.

    Future parts will deal with the many severe health effects from chronic JP-4 exposure. If you thought Agent Orange/TCDD alone was bad, prepare yourself.

  54. Don Mullis says:

    Did you use any of the following?

    Chemicals Used In Military Operations During The Vietnam War

    General use:

    Insecticide, DDT – Pyrethrum aerosol, G-1152, 12-oz, can.*
    Insecticide, Dichlorvos, 20% impregnated strips
    Insecticide, Lindane, 1% dusting powder, 2-oz. can**
    Insecticide, Pyrethrum, 0.6% aerosol, 12-oz. can
    Insecticide, Pyrethrum, 0.4% solution, 1-gal. can
    Repellent, Clothing and personal application, m 75% DEET, 6-oz. (aerosol can)
    Repellent, Clothing and personal application, m 75% DEET, 2-oz. (plastic bottle)
    Repellent, Clothing and personal application, m 75% DEET, ½-oz. (bottle, component of survival kit)
    Rodenticide, Anticoagulant, Ready mixed bait, 5-lb can
    Rodenticide, bait block, diphacin, 8-oz. block

    Supervision Required:

    Insecticide, Aluminum phosphide, tablets, can
    Insecticide, Aluminum phosphide, pellets, flask
    Insecticide, Baygon, 1% solution, 1-gal. can
    Insecticide, Baygon, 2% bait, 5-lb. bottle
    Insecticide, Carbaryl, 80% powder, 15-lb. pail
    Insecticide, Carbaryl-DDT, Micronized dust, 1-gram***
    Insecticide, Carbaryl-DDT, Micronized dust, 5-gram***
    Insecticide, Carbaryl-DDT, Micronized dust, 13-gram***
    Insecticide, Chlordane, 72% emulsifiable concentrate, 5-gal. pail
    Insecticide, Chlordane, 5%-6% dust, 25-lb. pail
    Insecticide, Diazinon, 0.5% solution, 1-gal. can
    Insecticide, Diazinon, 48% emulsifiable concentrate, 1-gal. can
    Insecticide, Dieldrin, 15% emulsifiable concentrate, 5-gal. pail
    Insecticide, DDT, 25% emulsifiable concentrate, 5-gal. pail

    * For disinsectization of aircraft in compliance with Public Health Quarantine.
    ** For use in control of body lice.
    *** For disinsectization of aircraft in compliance with Agricultural Quarantine.

    Insecticide, DDT, 75% wettable powder, 20-lb. pail
    Insecticide, Dichlorvos, 20% impregnated pellets, 30-lb. pail
    Insecticide, Dursban, 40.8% emulsifiable concentrate
    Insecticide, Lindane, 12% emulsifiable concentrate, 5-gal. pail
    Insecticide, Lindane, 1% dusting powder, 25-lb. pail
    Insecticide, Malathion, 57% emulsifiable concentrate, Grade A, (1-gal. can)
    Insecticide, Malathion, 57% emulsifiable concentrate, Grade B, (55-gal. drum)
    Insecticide, Malathion, 57% emulsifiable concentrate, Grade A, (5-gal. pail)
    Insecticide, Malathion, 95% solution concentrate 55-gal. Drum
    Insecticide, Methyl bromide, 98%, 150-lb. cylinder
    Insecticide, Methyl bromide, 98%, 1-lb. can
    Insecticide, Naled, 85% solution concentrate, 15-gal. drum
    Repellent, Clothing application, M-1960, 1-gal. can
    Repellent, Clothing application, 90% Benzyl benzoate, 1-gal. can
    Rodenticide, Anticoagulant, Universal concentrate, 1-lb. can
    Rodenticide, Calcium cyanide, 42% powder, 1-lb. can
    Rodenticide, Zinc phosphide, 80% powder, 1-oz. bottle
    Fungicide, Pentachlorophenol, 5% moisture retardant, 55-gal. drum
    Soil fumigant, SMDC (VAPAM) 32.7% solution
    Herbicide, Borate-Bromacil mixture, 50-lb. bag
    Herbicide, Bromacil, 80% powder, 50-lb. drum
    Herbicide, Chlorate-Borate mixture, 50-lb. bag
    Herbicide, Dacthal, 75% powder, 50-lb bag
    Herbicide, Dalapon, 85% powder, 50-lb. drum
    Herbicide, Dicamba, 49% solution, 1-gal. bottle
    Herbicide, Diquat, 35.3% solution, 5-gal. drum
    Herbicide, Diuron, 80% powder, 50-lb. drum
    Herbicide, DSMA, 63% disodium methylarsonate, 100-lb. drum
    Herbicide, Monuron, 80% powder, 50-lb. drum
    Herbicide, Picloram + 2,4-D, 5-gal. drum
    Herbicide, Picloram, 11.6% pellets, 50-lb. drum
    Herbicide, Silvex, Low Volatile Ester, 4-lb/gal., 5-gal. drum
    Herbicide, Simazinc, 80% powder, 5-lb. can
    Herbicide, 2,4-D, Low Volatile Ester, 4-lb/gal., 5-gal. can
    Herbicide, 2,4-D, Amine, 4-lb/gal., 5-gal. can
    Herbicide, 2,4,5-T, Low Volatile Ester, 4-lb/gal., 55-gal. drum
    Herbicide, 2,4,5-T, Low Volatile Ester, 4-lb/gal., 5-gal. pail

    Tactical:

    Herbicide, Cacodylic Acid (Blue), 55-gal. drum
    Herbicide, Picloram + 2,4-D, (White), 55-gal. drum
    Herbicide, 2,4-D + 2,4,5-T, High Volatile ester (Orange), 55-gal. drum

  55. Don Mullis says:

    something to think about

    US Military Bases Known To Be Contaminated (ca. 1992)
    (From: Life in the Times)

    The following 59 U.S. military bases were suffering from significant water or soil contamination a year
    ago, according to the Department of Defense’s interpretation of its latest hazardous waste survey. DoD
    officials say not every base suffering such contamination is on the list, because information was not
    available for all bases. The list is based on the latest status report for DoD’s Installation Restoration
    Program.

    The IRP report contains no explanation of the problems at each base, so we asked each service to
    provide details. The Army did so. The Navy Chief of Information refused to help us gather the
    information. Air Force Public Affairs could not provide the information by our deadline, but we will
    publish it as soon as it becomes available. We gathered information on some of these missing bases
    from EPA and a DoD report to Congress on “Superfund” sites. Life in the Times cannot vouch for the
    accuracy or completeness of the information that was provided.
    Army

    Aberdeen Proving Ground, MD
    Essentially every land portion of the Edgewood, MD, area (on which a portion of the base is located) Is
    contaminated or potentially contaminated. Monitoring in 1977-78 indicated contamination of surface
    and ground water. Four standby wells were shut down in 1983 due to detected organic compounds. The
    base’s active drinking water supplies come from two off-post sources. Deer Creek and Winters Run,
    unaffected by contamination on base.

    Fort A.P. Hill, VA. There are three problems. A herbicide
    contaminated the soil near an old pesticide storage building. The soil has been placed in sealed drums.
    Second, herbicide and dioxin Contaminated soil and debris are stored at a base warehouse in 33-gallon
    drums inside sealed 55-gallon drums. A study will be done to recommend an environmentally sound
    method of permanent disposal. Third, the base plans to remove some 70 tons of soil contaminated by
    DDT. The base water comes from a deep aquifer and is not contaminated, the Army says.

    Fort Belvoir, VA
    Several contaminants – benzene, trichloroethylene, chloroform, toluene, ethylbenzene, and 1-2-
    dichloroethane – have seeped from the Building 324 tank farm into an unnamed creek. None of these
    contaminants was detected in surface water at the installation boundary, and no health hazard is
    apparent, the Army, says. Post drinking water comes from the Fairfax County Water Authority.

    Fort Devens, MA
    A sanitary landfill that is a potential source of contamination is being closed. It was used as an open
    burning site, then for incineration of waste and burial of residues. Water quality meets state
    standards.

    Fort Dix, NJ
    Nine potentially contaminated sites are known. One, the sanitary landfill, was placed on the National
    Priority (Superfund) List due to the presence of organic solvents. However, the Army says no
    significant health hazards have been identified. To avoid any risk, the landfill may be capped with
    clean soil and vegetated with grass. The other eight sites were identified only recently. Organic
    solvents and/or petroleum products were located at an old magazine area, a tank farm, a fire station,
    the golf course, a motor pool, a firing range, a pesticide storage building, and a National Guard facility.
    Investigation is under way to determine any problems. The sites to not endanger the base water supply
    according to the Army.

    Fort Lewis, WA
    There are two problems: One, is Landfill No. 5. Plans call for a landfill liner and leachate collection to
    preclude ground water contamination. There are also plans for a refuse-fired incinerator to reduce
    reliance in the landfill. Also trichloroethylene (TCE) has been found in the ground water beneath the
    Logistics Center. Post drinking water comes from a spring unrelated to that aquifer.

    Fort McClellan, AL
    Ten old training areas and three former disposal sites have a slight chance of subsurface
    contamination from mustard agent and its breakdown products and possible byproducts of chemical
    agent decontamination. Only very small quantities of agent were used and all sites have been closed,
    decontaminated and fenced. No evidence of any surface or surface water contamination has been found
    in the past, the Army says. The post receives its water from the city of Anniston.

    Redstone Arsenal, AL
    A $30 million cleanup was recently completed by Olin Corp, which made DDT in a leased factory that
    was closed in 1970 for environmental reasons. Manufacturing waste was contaminating soils and
    streams. DDT was found in the wildlife food chain but not in potable water supplies inside or outside
    the base. In addition, the presence of PCBs. heavy metals, while phosphorous and other organic
    compounds is known or suspected. An investigation is under way to determine if they contaminated
    the active sanitary landfill, a DDT waste landfill, open burning and detonation grounds, and 22 old
    disposal sites. Also, a $5 million program is in progress to remove all asbestos from post buildings.

    Navy

    Brunswick NAS, ME
    A study is under way to determine contaminants and their migration habits.

    Lakehurst Naval Air Engineering Center, NJ
    Soil and shallow ground water at the tetraethyl lead disposal site are contaminated, perhaps from
    aviation fuel. The ground water in some areas is covered with a 6-inch layer of JP-Fuel. Elsewhere, the
    carcinogen nitronomine may be present. Waste oils, battery acid, and solvents are suspected of having
    been discharged into some dry wells. The soil stabilization field test received 362 gallons of aniline and
    161 of furfural (toxic by ingestion, inhalation, or skin absorption), and ferric choride solution; personnel
    and animals that come in contact with the soil may be endangered. A landfill received thousands of
    gallons of hydraulic fluids, five tons of asbestos, and also cutting oils, solvents, sludge. and heavy
    metals. A site for PCB testing and storage is near the environmentally sensitive Ridgeway Branch. The
    western portion of the base may be contaminated by ordnance: shells, gas-loaded projectiles, phosgene,
    phosphorus, mustard agent, explosives, flares, and depth bombs. The shallow aquifer in this area may
    also be contaminated.

    Moffett Field NAS, CA
    The major contaminants in the ground water are volatile organic compounds.

    Whidbey Island NAS, WA
    The ground water could be contaminated. Waste oil, solvents, fuel, and caustic rinse water containing
    heavy metals have been discharged through the storm sewer system and into Dugella Bay. Waterfowl
    and fish that feed or live in drainage’s may be affected. Subsurface migration at the seaplane base may
    have affected fish or shellfish in Oak and Crescent Harbors. A backup well at Ault Field is threatened
    by potential migration of contaminants.

    Other Navy bases:

    China Lake, CA
    Indian Head NOS, MD
    Jacksonville NAS, FL
    Miramar NAS, CA
    Pabmont River NAS, MD
    Roosevelt Roads NS, Puerto Rico

    Air Force

    Castle AFB, CA
    On-base drinking water supply has been contaminated with trichloroethylene (TCE). Work is under
    way to install a new well drawing from a deeper, uncontaminated aquifer.

    Dover AFB, DE
    Ground on the is contaminated with arsenic and other metals, and a stream on base is contaminated
    US Military Bases Known To Be Contaminated (ca. 1992) 20100326 3
    with trichloroethylene (TCE). The base well, however, is free of these contaminants. Remedial action
    has been under way since 1985.

    Griffiss AFB, NY
    Phenols, ethyl benzene, and benzene have been detected in ground water on base, and toulene in
    surface water on base.

    Hill AFB, UT
    Seepage water near two disposal areas contains toxic organic chemicals, such as trichloroethylene
    (TCE), 1-2 dichloroethane, and 1,1,1 trichlorethane. None of the affected water is used for human
    consumption. Remedial action to date includes construction of a slurry wall and landfill covers as well
    as pumping and treating contaminated ground water.

    Mather AFB, CA
    Water in 36 homes was affected by trichloroethylene (TCE) contamination of a well on base. A new
    permanent water supply is to be provided to these homes.

    McChord AFB, WA
    Various chemicals — methylene chloride, chloroform, benzene, arsenic, chromium, and mercury — have
    been detected in test wells and in surface drainage leaving the base. One site is a liquid waste spill
    next to the wash rack and industrial waste treatment system. Contracted work for the American Lake
    Gardens Water Supply Project began in 1985; a contractor installed shallow wells and one deep well.

    McClellan AFB, CA
    An estimated 160 sites have been identified. Contaminants include organic compounds, such as
    trichloroethylene (TCE), methylene chloride, and 1-1 dichloreythlene. Wells both on and off base that
    had contaminants exceeding government standards have been shut down. McClellan is considered a
    leader in cleanup efforts. Completed projects include alternate water supply for off base residents and
    a ground water containment system and treatment plant.

    Norton AFB, CA
    Trichloroethylene (TCE) was detected in concentrations exceeding state drinking water standards. All
    base wells were contaminated to various degrees with silver and tetrachlorethylene (PCE). Closure of a
    lagoon and sludge removal was begun several years ago.

    Robins AFB, GA
    Contaminants include halogenated solvents, heavy metals, pesticides (DDT, chordane, etc.), cyanide,
    and oil products. The toxic organic compounds trichloroethylene (TCE), and tetrachloroethylene (PCE)
    have been detected in ground water on base. Ground water is not used as drinking water, but the
    contaminants could eventually appear in surface water.

    Tinker AFB, OK
    Some base wells were closed due to contamination from chlorinated solvents. Chlorinated solvents
    were also detected in the aquifer that is the primary water source in the region. Organic compounds
    have been detected at all sites, though migration is limited. Remedial action begun in 1984, includes
    capping landfill No. 6, and stopping leaks from underground storage tanks at the fuel farm.

    Wright-Patterson AFB, Ohio
    Fourteen organic compounds, including trichloroethylene (TCE) and tetrachloroethylene (PCE) in
    relatively high quantities have been found in wells serving the base. Nearly half the 17 wells have
    been shut down due to contamination or age. An air stripper has been put on two wells to remove the
    organics, and installation of two other strippers is planned.

    Other Air Force bases:

    Beale AFB, CA
    Chanute AFB, IL
    Charleston AFB, SC
    Columbus AFB, MS
    Edwards AFB, CA
    England AFB, LA
    F.E. Warren AFB, WY
    George AFB, CA
    Hanscorn AFB, MA
    Hickam AFB, HI
    Kelly AFB, TX
    Lowery AFB, CO
    Luke AFB, AZ
    Kirtland AFB, NM
    Langley AFB, VA
    MacDill AFB, FL
    McGuire AFB, NJ
    Moody AFB, GA
    Mountain Home AFB, ID
    Otis AG Base, MA
    Pope AFB, NC
    Pease AFB, NH
    Plattsburgh AFB, NY
    Reese AFB, TX
    Seymour Johnson AFB, NC
    Shemya, AK
    Travis AFB, CA
    Vandenburg AFB, CA
    Wurtsmith AFB, MI

    http://www.va.gov – Department of Veteran Affairs (VA) Web Si

  56. Don Mullis says:

    from the web site VA.gov

    Hepatitis C
    Vietnam-era Veterans are at risk for hepatitis C. Talk to your provider about getting tested.

  57. Don Mullis says:

    from the web site VA.gov

    Asbestos

    Exposure to asbestos can be a serious health risk if asbestos-containing material is disturbed in such a way that the particles and fibers become airborne. Symptoms of asbestos-related diseases, such as shortness of breath, coughing, and chest pain, often do not appear until 20 to 50 years after the exposure.

    Veterans who served in any of the following occupations may have been exposed to asbestos: mining, milling, shipyard work, insulation work, demolition of old buildings, carpentry and construction, manufacturing and installation of products such as flooring and roofing.

    Breathing asbestos mainly causes problems in the lungs and the membrane that surrounds the lungs, including:

    • Asbestosis: Scarring of lung tissue that causes breathing problems, usually in workers exposed to asbestos in workplaces before the Federal government began regulating asbestos use (mid-1970s).

    • Pleural plaques: Scarring in the inner surface of the ribcage and area surrounding the lungs that can cause breathing problems, though usually not as serious as asbestosis. People living in areas with high environmental levels of asbestos, as well as workers, can develop pleural plaques.

    • Cancer: The two types of cancer caused by exposure to asbestos are lung cancer and mesothelioma, a cancer of the thin lining surrounding the lung (pleural membrane) or abdominal cavity (the peritoneum). Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer usually caused by asbestos exposure.

    Industrial Solvents

    Many Servicemembers use industrial solvents in regular military tasks such as cleaning, degreasing, paint stripping, and thinning oil-based paints. Too much exposure to some industrial solvents can cause short-term and long-term health effects.

    Exposure to solvents may impact your health depending on the specific chemicals, level of concentration, length of exposure, and how it enters the body.

    • Inhaled vapors: These may irritate the eyes, cause drowsiness, difficulty with breathing and if severe, neurological damage

    • Direct eye contact: This may cause burning and tearing and if severe, visual problems.

    • Skin contact: This may cause skin dryness, irritation, rashes or chemical burns.

    • Ingested: Although rare, this can cause serious illness.

    • Benzene (55 KB, PDF) (and other aromatic hydrocarbons)

    • Perchlorate (66 KB, PDF)

    • Perfluorooctane sulfonate (135 KB, PDF) (and other perfluorinated surfactants)

    • Tetrachloroethylene (PCE or PERC) (145 KB, PDF)

    • Trichloroethylene (TCE)

    • Vinyl chloride (59 KB, PDF), which can form when TCE and PCE are broken down

    Fuels (Petroleum, Oils, Lubricants)

    Some Servicemembers may have been exposed to fuels, such as diesel and JP-8, used to operate vehicles in deployment settings.
    Possible health effects depend on how they were exposed (skin, oral, or breathing), length of time exposed, and personal factors such as age, gender, genetic traits, and diet.

    Health effects may include irritation to unprotected skin, eye and upper respiratory irritation, fatigue, breathing difficulty, headaches, dizziness, and sleep disturbances. Drinking fuels is dangerous and may result in convulsions, coma and even death.
    Scientific research on long-term effects is not conclusive. However, if an individual is exposed to large amounts of fuel for a long period of time, research shows there is a potential for health effects, such as lung and heart problems.

    Military Occupational Exposure to Radiation

    Various military occupations include routine and usually safe exposure to radiation. Servicemembers in these occupations receive special training and are monitored to ensure radiation exposure remains at safe levels.

    This group includes Veterans who:

    • Served on nuclear submarines and other nuclear ships or in shipyards

    • Were involved in nuclear weapons handling and maintenance, including clean-ups after accidents

    • Served as X-ray or dental technicians

    Diseases Associated with Ionizing Radiation Exposure

    VA has recognized certain diseases as related to ionizing radiation exposure during military service. Veterans may be eligible for disability compensation and health care for these diseases. Their survivors also may be eligible for survivors’ benefits.

    Presumptive diseases related to ionizing radiation

    For Veterans who participated in a radiation-risk activity during service (including “Atomic Veterans”), VA assumes that certain cancers are related to their exposure. We call these “presumptive diseases.”

    • Cancers of the bile ducts, bone, brain, breast, colon, esophagus, gall bladder, liver (primary site, but not if cirrhosis or hepatitis B is indicated), lung (including bronchiolo-alveolar cancer), pancreas, pharynx, ovary, salivary gland, small intestine, stomach, thyroid, urinary tract (kidney/renal, pelvis, urinary bladder, and urethra)

    • Leukemia (except chronic lymphocytic leukemia)

    • Lymphomas (except Hodgkin’s disease)

    • Multiple myeloma (cancer of plasma cells)

    These Veterans don’t have to prove a connection between these diseases and their service to be eligible for disability compensation. Their survivors also may be eligible for survivors’ benefits if the Veteran dies as the result of one of these diseases.
    Other diseases associated with radiation exposure
    VA recognizes that the following diseases are possibly caused by exposure to ionizing radiation during service:

    • All cancers
    • Non-malignant thyroid nodular disease
    • Parathyroid adenoma
    • Posterior subcapsular cataracts
    • Tumors of the brain and central nervous system

    Facts About Radiation

    Radiation is energy that comes from a source and travels through space. When this energy passes into the body, either by penetrating skin or being swallowed or inhaled, it may be harmful.
    Whether the radiation is ionizing or non-ionizing will influence the health risks.

    Ionizing radiation

    Ionizing radiation is the high-energy radiation that causes most of the concerns about radiation exposure during military service.
    Ionizing radiation contains enough energy to remove an electron (ionize) from an atom or molecule and to damage DNA in cells.
    Sources of ionizing radiation during military service include:

    • Nuclear weapons handling and detonation
    • Weapons and other military equipment made with depleted uranium
    • Radioactive material
    • Calibration and measurement sources
    • X-rays

    Non-ionizing radiation

    Non-iodizing radiation is low-energy radiation that includes radiation from sources such as sunlight, microwaves, radio frequencies, radar and sonar.

    Polychlorinated Biphenyls (PCBs)

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are manufactured organic chemicals that are no longer produced in the United States, but are still in the environment and can cause health problems. PCBs do not easily break down and may remain in the air, water and soil for long periods of time.

    Products made before 1977 that may contain PCBs include old fluorescent lighting fixtures and electrical devices containing PCB capacitors, and old microscope and hydraulic oils. PCBs also are common contaminants in fish.

    Exposure to PCBs

    Veterans at risk for PCB exposure during military service are those who, before 1977, worked on repair and maintenance of PCB transformers, capacitors, and conduits.

    Other ways of exposure to PCBs include eating contaminated food (a major source is fish caught in contaminated lakes or rivers); breathing air near hazardous waste sites, and drinking contaminated water.

    Health problems associated with exposure to PCBs

    The most common health problems for people exposed to large amounts of PCBs are skin conditions such as acne and rashes. Studies in exposed workers have shown changes in blood and urine that may indicate liver damage.

  58. Don Mullis says:

    Here are some of the information VA ask for in your claim for Asbestos or/and Radiation exposure.

    EXPOSURE TO ASBESTOS

    • Provide answers to the following questions about your claim for disability resulting from exposure to asbestos:

    • Where were you exposed to asbestos? (Organization, rank, task group, company or squadron, etc.)

    • When were you exposed?

    • How were you exposed?

    • What are the names of other service persons who were with you at the time of exposure?

    • What other things that may cause cancer (cigarettes, chemicals etc.) were you exposed to while in service? After service?

    • ‘Yhat type of work did you do before service? What type of work have you been doing smce service? Please state how long you did each job.

    • T.ell ~s. the specific disease that resulted fr~m asbestos exposure. Tell us why you believe the disability was caused by asbestos and provide some evidence, such as a medical opinion, of this relationship.

    EXPOSURE TO RADIATION

    • Tell us the specific disability caused by exposure to radiation.

    • Tell us more about your exposure to radiation. Use the enclosed Radiation Risk Actiyity

    Information sheet as a guide on what to tell us. Include a full description of your dunes and activities while a participant in a radiation-risk activity.

    • You should provide a medical report of the first diagnosis of the disease. If you cannot,tell us the date that the disease was first diagnosed or treated. Tell us also the names and addresses of physicians who have ~~e any subsequent diagn~sis and/or proyided treatment for the disease. Send us complete clinical records, not s~es, of all medic~l car~received for this radiation disability during and after service, Send us reports discussing all tissue blocks, slides, or other pathology samples. You may want to show this letter to your doctor.

  59. Don Mullis says:

    Were are the Veteran Service Organizations (VSO’s) Why have they not published the list of military bases on the National Priority List (EPA Superfunds), the chemicals found by EPA and the health effects of exposure.

    MILITARY BASES ON THE NPL (EPA SUPERUNDS)

    US Air Force Links

    Fort Worth TX Air Force Plant #4 (General Dynamics)

    Columbus OH Air Force Plant 85

    Littleton CO Air Force Plant PJKS

    Tacoma WA American Lake Gardens/McChord AFB

    Yigo GU Andersen Air Force Base

    Andrews Air Force Base MD Andrews Air Force Base

    Tullahoma/Manchester TN Arnold Engineering Development Center (USAF)

    Brandywine MD Brandywine DRMO

    Merced CA Castle Air Force Base (6 Areas)

    Rantoul IL Chanute Air Force Base

    Dover DE Dover Air Force Base

    Edwards AFB CA Edwards Air Force Base

    Fairbanks AK Eielson Air Force Base

    Ellsworth AFB SD Ellsworth Air Force Base

    Anchorage AK Elmendorf Air Force Base

    Cheyenne WY F.E. Warren Air Force Base

    Spokane WA Fairchild Air Force Base (4 Waste Areas)

    Victorville CA George Air Force Base

    Rome NY Griffiss Air Force Base (11 Areas)

    Bedford MA Hanscom Field/Hanscom Air Force Base

    Hill AFB UT Hill Air Force Base

    Homestead Air Force Base FL Homestead Air Force Base

    Limestone ME Loring Air Force Base

    Glendale AZ Luke Air Force Base

    Riverside CA March Air Force Base

    Mather CA Mather Air Force Base (AC&W Disposal Site)

    Tacoma WA McChord Air Force Base (Wash Rack/Treatment Area)

    McClellan AFB CA McClellan Air Force Base (Ground Water Contamination)

    Wrightstown NJ McGuire Air Force Base #1

    Mountain Home ID Mountain Home Air Force Base

    San Bernardino CA Norton Air Force Base (Lndfll #2)

    Portsmouth/Newington NH Pease Air Force Base

    Plattsburgh NY Plattsburgh Air Force Base

    Lockbourne OH Rickenbacker Air National Guard (USAF)

    Houston County GA Robins Air Force Base (Landfill #4/Sludge Lagoon)

    Oklahoma City OK Tinker Air Force Base (Soldier Creek/Building 3001)

    Travis AFB CA Travis Air Force Base

    Minneapolis MN Twin Cities Air Force Reserve Base (Small Arms Range Landfill)

    Panama City FL Tyndall Air Force Base

    Chandler AZ Williams Air Force Base

    Dayton OH Wright-Patterson Air Force Base

    Oscoda MI Wurtsmith Air Force Base

    US Army Links

    Edgewood MD Aberdeen Proving Ground (Edgewood Area)

    Aberdeen MD Aberdeen Proving Ground (Michaelsville Landfill)

    Childersburg AL Alabama Army Ammunition Plant

    Anniston AL Anniston Army Depot (Southeast Industrial Area)

    Hall County NE Cornhusker Army Ammunition Plant

    Fort Devens MA Fort Devens

    Sudbury MA Fort Devens-Sudbury Training Annex

    Pemberton Township NJ Fort Dix (Landfill Site)

    Newport News VA Fort Eustis (US Army)

    Odenton MD Fort George G. Meade

    Tacoma WA Fort Lewis (Landfill No. 5)

    Tillicum WA Fort Lewis Logistics Center

    Marina CA Fort Ord

    Anchorage AK Fort Richardson (USARMY)

    Junction City KS Fort Riley

    Fort Wainwright AK Fort Wainwright

    Middletown IA Iowa Army Ammunition Plant

    Joliet IL Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (Load-Assembly-Packing Area)

    Joliet IL Joliet Army Ammunition Plant (Manufacturing Area)

    Independence MO Lake City Army Ammunition Plant (Northwest Lagoon)

    Franklin County PA Letterkenny Army Depot (PDO Area)

    Chambersburg PA Letterkenny Army Depot (SE Area)

    Texarkana TX Lone Star Army Ammunition Plant

    Karnack TX Longhorn Army Ammunition Plant

    Doyline LA Louisiana Army Ammunition Plant

    Watertown MA Materials Technology Laboratory (USARMY)

    Milan TN Milan Army Ammunition Plant

    Natick MA Natick Laboratory Army Research, and Engineering Center

    New Brighton MN New Brighton/Arden Hills/TCAAP (USARMY)

    Rockaway Township NJ Picatinny Arsenal (USARMY)

    Riverbank CA Riverbank Army Ammunition Plant

    Adams County CO Rocky Mountain Arsenal (USARMY)

    Sacramento CA Sacramento Army Depot

    Savanna IL Savanna Army Depot Activity

    Schofield HI Schofield Barracks (USARMY)

    Romulus NY Seneca Army Depot

    Lathrop CA Sharpe Army Depot

    Desoto KS Sunflower Army Ammunition Plant

    Tobyhanna PA Tobyhanna Army Depot

    Tooele UT Tooele Army Depot (North Area)

    Tracy CA Tracy Defense Depot (USARMY)

    Hermiston OR Umatilla Army Depot (Lagoons)

    Huntsville AL US Army/NASA Redstone Arsenal

    St. Charles County MO Weldon Spring Former Army Ordnance Works

    Point Pleasant WV West Virginia Ordnance (USARMY)

    US Coast Guard Link
    Baltimore MD Curtis Bay Coast Guard Yard

    U. S. Navy Links

    Adak AK Adak Naval Air Station

    Alameda CA Alameda Naval Air Station

    Mineral County WV Allegany Ballistics Laboratory (USNAVY)

    Silverdale WA Bangor Naval Submarine Base

    Bremerton WA Bangor Ordnance Disposal (USNAVY)

    Barstow CA Barstow Marine Corps Logistics Base

    Brunswick ME Brunswick Naval Air Station

    Onslow County NC Camp Lejeune Military Res. (USNAVY)

    Camp Pendleton CA Camp Pendleton Marine Corps Base

    Havelock NC Cherry Point Marine Corps Air Station

    Concord CA Concord Naval Weapons Station

    North Kingstown RI Davisville Naval Construction Battalion Center

    El Toro CA El Toro Marine Corps Air Station

    Indian Head MD Indian Head Naval Surface Warfare Center

    Kitsap County WA Jackson Park Housing Complex (USNAVY)

    Jacksonville FL Jacksonville Naval Air Station

    Quantico VA Marine Corps Combat Development Command

    Albany GA Marine Corps Logistics Base

    Moffett Field CA Moffett Naval Air Station

    Warminster Township PA Naval Air Development Center (8 Waste Areas)

    Lakehurst NJ Naval Air Engineering Center

    Whidbey Island WA Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island (Ault Field)

    Whidbey Island WA Naval Air Station, Whidbey Island (Seaplane Base)

    Virginia Beach VA Naval Amphibious Base Little Creek

    Wahiawa HI Naval Computer and Telecommunications Area Master Station EP

    Fridley MN Naval Industrial Reserve Ordnance Plant

    Sabana Seca PR Naval Security Group Activity

    Dahlgren VA Naval Surface Warfare Center – Dahlgren

    Keyport WA Naval Undersea Warfare Engineering Station (4 Waste Areas)

    Bedford MA Naval Weapons Industrial Reserve Plant

    Yorktown VA Naval Weapons Station – Yorktown

    Colts Neck NJ Naval Weapons Station Earle (Site A)

    Mechanicsburg PA Navy Ships Parts Control Center

    New London CT New London Submarine Base

    Newport RI Newport Naval Education & Training Center

    Norfolk VA Norfolk Naval Base (Sewells Point Naval Complex)

    Portsmouth VA Norfolk Naval Shipyard

    Yorktown VA NWS Yorktown – Cheatham Annex

    Parris Island SC Parris Island Marine Corps Recruit Depot

    Patuxent River MD Patuxent River Naval Air Station

    Pearl Harbor HI Pearl Harbor Naval Complex

    Pensacola FL Pensacola Naval Air Station

    Indian Island WA Port Hadlock Detachment (USNAVY)

    Kittery ME Portsmouth Naval Shipyard

    Bremerton WA Puget Sound Naval Shipyard Complex

    Weymouth MA South Weymouth Naval Air Station

    Chesapeake VA St. Juliens Creek Annex (U.S. Navy)

    San Francisco CA Treasure Island Naval Station-Hunters Point Annex

    Jacksonville FL USN Air Station Cecil Field

    Washington DC Washington Navy Yard Milton FL
    Whiting Field Naval Air Station

    Horsham PA Willow Grove Naval Air and Air Reserve Station

    Yuma AZ Yuma Marine Corps Air Station

  60. Don Mullis says:

    Think about were you worked and lived.

    Fuels (Petroleum, Oils, Lubricants)

    Some Service members may have been exposed to fuels, such as diesel and JP-8, used to operate vehicles in deployment settings.

    Possible health effects depend on how they were exposed (skin, oral, or breathing), length of time exposed, and personal factors such as age, gender, genetic traits, and diet.

    Symptoms of exposure to fuels

    Health effects may include irritation to unprotected skin, eye and upper respiratory irritation, fatigue, breathing difficulty, headaches, dizziness, and sleep disturbances. Drinking fuels is dangerous and may result in convulsions, coma and even death.

    Scientific research on long-term effects is not conclusive. However, if an individual is exposed to large amounts of fuel for a long period of time, research shows there is a potential for health effects, such as lung and heart problems.

    Industrial Solvents

    Many Service members use industrial solvents in regular military tasks such as cleaning, degreasing, paint stripping, and thinning oil-based paints. Too much exposure to some industrial solvents can cause short-term and long-term health effects.

    Health effects of exposure to solvents

    Exposure to solvents may impact your health depending on the specific chemicals, level of concentration, length of exposure, and how it enters the body.
    • Inhaled vapors: These may irritate the eyes, cause drowsiness, difficulty with breathing and if severe, neurological damage
    • Direct eye contact: This may cause burning and tearing and if severe, visual problems.
    • Skin contact: This may cause skin dryness, irritation, rashes or chemical burns.
    • Ingested: Although rare, this can cause serious illness.

    Specific solvents

    For information on specific solvents, the Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry (ATSDR) provides the following fact sheets:

    Benzene (and other aromatic hydrocarbons) long-term benzene exposure causes effects on the bone marrow and can cause anemia and leukemia. Benzene has been found in at least 1,000 of the 1,684 National Priority List (NPL) sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    How might I be exposed to benzene?

    Outdoor air contains low levels of benzene from tobacco smoke, automobile service stations, exhaust from motor vehicles, and industrial emissions.

    Vapors (or gases) from products that contain benzene, such as glues, paints, furniture wax, and detergents, can also be a source of exposure.

    Air around hazardous waste sites or gas stations will contain higher levels of benzene.

    Perchlorate Solid perchlorates are very reactive chemicals that are used mainly in fireworks, explosives, and rocket motors. The general population may be exposed to perchlorate from contaminated drinking water, food, and milk. High levels of perchlorate can affect the thyroid gland, which in turn can alter the function of many organs in the body. Developing organisms can be especially susceptible. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) reported that perchlorate has been found in 40 of the 1547 National Priority List sites.

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (and other perfluorinated surfactants) How might I be exposed to perchlorate?

    Perchlorates entered the environment where rockets were made, tested, and taken apart. Factories that make or use perchlorates may also release them to soil and water.

    Drinking water that is contaminated with perchlorate. Most contaminated water supplies are found near sites where perchlorate has been found.

    Eating food, including milk, contaminated with perchlorate.

    Living near factories that make fireworks, flares, or other explosive devices, or living near a waste site or a rocket manufacturing or testing facility.

    Perchlorate affects the ability of the thyroid gland to take up iodine. Iodine is needed to make thyroid hormones that regulate many body functions after they are released into the blood.

    The available human studies suggest that increases in blood cholesterol levels are associated with higher PFOA or PFOS blood levels. There is also some indication that serum PFOA or PFOS may be associated with increased uric acid levels, which may be associated with an increased risk of high blood pressure. PFOA or PFOS exposure may also cause liver damage.

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE or PERC) Tetrachloroethylene has been found in at least 945 of the 1,699 National Priorities List sites identified by U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA).

    When you drink water containing tetrachloroethylene, you are exposed to it. You
    might also be exposed to tetrachloroethylene that is released into the air during showering and bathing.

    People residing near contaminated sites or dry cleaning locations may be exposed to higher levels than the general population.

    People working in the dry cleaning industries or using metal degreasing products may be exposed to elevated levels of tetrachloroethylene.

    How can tetrachloroethylene affect my health?

    Exposure for longer periods to low levels of tetrachloroethylene may cause changes in mood, memory, attention, reaction time, and vision. Studies in humans suggest that exposure to tetrachloroethylene might lead to a higher risk of getting bladder cancer, multiple myeloma, or non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma,
    Trichloroethylene (TCE) The National Toxicology Program (NTP) is recommending a change in cancer classification to “known human carcinogen”
    The two major uses of trichloroethylene are as a solvent to remove grease from metal parts and as a chemical that is used to make other chemicals, especially the refrigerant, HFC-134a. Trichloroethylene was once used as an anesthetic for surgery.

    How might I be exposed to trichloroethylene?
    • Breathing trichloroethylene in contaminated air.
    • Drinking contaminated water.
    • Workers at facilities using this substance for metal degreasing are exposed to higher levels of trichloroethylene.
    • If you live near such a facility or near a hazardous waste site containing trichloroethylene, you may also have higher exposure to this substance.
    • Eating or breathing high levels of trichloroethylene may damage some of the nerves in the face. Exposure to high levels can also result in changes in the rhythm of the heartbeat, liver damage, and evidence of kidney damage. Skin contact with concentrated solutions of trichloroethylene can cause skin rashes.
    • There is some evidence exposure to trichloroethylene in the work place may cause scleroderma (a systemic autoimmune disease) in some people. Some men occupationally-exposed to trichloroethylene and other chemicals showed decreases in sex drive, sperm quality, and reproductive hormone levels.

    How likely is trichloroethylene to cause cancer?

    There is strong evidence that trichloroethylene can cause kidney cancer in people and some evidence for trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer and malignant lymphoma. Lifetime exposure to trichloroethylene resulted in increased liver cancer in mice and increased kidney cancer and testicular cancer in rats.

    How can trichloroethylene affect children?

    It is not known whether children are more susceptible than adults to the effects of trichloroethylene.

    Some human studies indicate that trichloroethylene may cause developmental effects such as spontaneous abortion, congenital heart defects, central nervous system defects, and small birth weight. However, these people were exposed to other chemicals as well.

    In some animal studies, exposure to trichloroethylene during development caused decreases in body weight, increases in heart defects, changes to the developing nervous system, and effects on the immune system.
    Vinyl chloride , which can form when TCE and PCE are broken down Breathing vinyl chloride for long periods of time can result in permanent liver damage, immune reactions, nerve damage, and liver cancer. This substance has been found in at least 616 of the 1,662 National Priority List (NPL) sites identified by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA). It can be formed when other substances such as trichloroethane, trichloroethylene, and tetrachloroethylene are broken down. Vinyl chloride is used to make polyvinyl chloride (PVC). PVC is used to make a variety of plastic products, including pipes, wire and cable coatings, and packaging materials. Vinyl chloride is also known as chloroethene, chloroethylene, and ethylene monochloride.

    Vinyl chloride in the air breaks down in a few days to other substances, some of which can be harmful.

    How might I be exposed to vinyl chloride?

    Breathing vinyl chloride that has been released from plastics industries, hazardous waste sites, and landfills.

    Breathing vinyl chloride in air or during contact with your skin or eyes in the workplace.

    Drinking water from contaminated wells.

    Some people who have breathed vinyl chloride for several years have changes in the structure of their livers. People are more likely to develop these changes if they breathe high levels of vinyl chloride. Some people who work with vinyl chloride have nerve damage and develop immune reactions.

    How likely is vinyl chloride to cause cancer?
    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS) has determined that vinyl chloride is a known carcinogen. Studies in workers who have breathed vinyl chloride over many years showed an increased risk of liver, brain, lung cancer, and some cancers of the blood have also been observed in workers.

    How can vinyl chloride affect children?
    It has not been proven that vinyl chloride causes birth defects in humans, but studies in animals suggest that vinyl chloride might affect growth and development. Animal studies also suggest that infants and young children might be more susceptible than adults to vinyl chloride-induced cancer.

  61. hey well not dead yet terry olliges tom b and myself have been talking to some senitors after being turned down for the six time, well one more appeal what the hell. desley snyder is one of the number one veteran service officer officer the vets have in indian 812 738 4249 sen douglas donnelly rep arnold grant achenbach veteranservice 317 232 9793 rep eberhart rep kirchofer. tim dyke director of training russ eaglin 1 317 232 3910 ok i ask for more comp. after talking to senator joe donnelly response was you got 10 percent 128.00dollers a month cant have a person to drive me 60 miles to v.a. senator donnellys office must not have look closely at the paper work . but thats ok vote time is right around the cornor been back in hospital stated they have no reason or ramy. what is wrong // ok go to the star report it tell you that if you worked at the sites you were made sick if you dont find it call me i will sent it too you they dont want you too see this one1 502 612 2099 please keep on this for are sister and brothers passed and still here just trying too stay alive. i have tons of info on the missile sites, ooo the numer for sen donnelly317 226 5555 beware went to va hospital allergic to morophine and the first thing they did was shoot me up full of morophine. dont think will not go back for a short time . had well be back soon love terry o

  62. well i am back carlog alonso if you worked. in the section. or area were missiles were/ you were exposed… the star report states which i have persons working in the sits were contaminated. tom and myself and alot of you all after 5 years looking into being sick cancer skin eyes hips arms legs, ooo well looks like you me tom and so on if you took all the military records medical put them in a pile one great great big one passed them out too each vet on this chat line a vet doctor could not tell the one that the health records would belong toooo all are the same have a good night terry o have a good night tom b

  63. hello well went the va hosp. i had fell one day before x mass b p 64 over 38 not good lost one tooth blood and now all of my bottom teeth turning black/ but v.a. said even tho i am not 100 persent they wood help out some they at the v.a. wood help all vets with teeth prom.if it does cost at v.a, 350,bucke if you hunt differnt buck well tom b going into hospital soon. hip replacement take about 10 mins look back at the list of people on this list you can count me. say a pray for him and all of us the world aint like it use to be no on e one running for office has help one of us.epa fund alb bill c hill c pays out to super fund, millions upon millions.clean up at nike sites.if you have people that worked with radar and missiles please tell them to go on the list with all you and i.see you soon t terry o your friend

  64. one more simon hope you are doing good in sunny cal simon t after a week puting it together 3.56 millon american green back. too clean up nike missile site. epa out of funds and 22 others also states they have no more money simon a nice ribb i would be nice/by the way how much for the old site if i nay ask getting cold in indiana i am from ky born raised.

  65. don mullis could you call me 1 502 612 2099 terry thats all fokes

  66. Don Mullis says:

    Something to kept in mind about your time in the military.

    Veterans may have been exposed to a range of chemical, physical, and environmental hazards during military service.

    1960 and 1970 military clean small arms weapons with dry cleaners solvents.

    1974 Federal government began regulating asbestos use

    1977 and before PCBs include, hydraulic oils, old fluorescent lighting fixtures and electrical devices containing PCB capacitors, old microscope, transformers, capacitors, and conduits.

    1979 and before use high sulfur diesel fuels

    1980 late went to DS2 lower sulfur diesel fuels

    1983 Federal government began removing lead from paint

    1990 went to JP8

    2016 firefighting form is a problem

  67. TerryOlliges says:

    hello tom and don its me, well just got out of the hospital.have gut pain.said they have no idiea.but i was told. i was having withdrawals from pain meds.because i ask for painmeds. 63 years old.police officer.ret.two medals of honor, over 1000 felony arrests,too many misdemeanors to name. Well i left the hospital.not a good thing to do, but dont tell me i am lying…everytime/ you go to v.a.hosp. and ask for pain.meds you are in trouble. if you have had the same trouble tell us please. so i know it aint just me. will give you pain meds but you gotta piss or go to pain management??? Doctors stay about 2 weeks then go to univ. of louisville hospital.gone.never to be well just gone.i have had 40 heart doctors.. what the hell;they told me. that i me not me.talk excessively.about missiles.contaminants.but dont think??they the doctors dont have a clue.most tell me i was not even born then sir/they are not dumb/cant take a 30 year old doc back 45 years ago. he or she does not understand they most likely were not even dreamed of/ must of them are not even as old as our kids. guess guess guess. Drs have no idea been took from doctors office to va hospital 7 times by e.m.s. admitted 15 times but told by DOD you are old you didnt do that well its been too long thats a crock.went way way back ann paid alot of people and forgot about you/// dependents are getting robbed??they all should receive death benefits/ but they make them prove that whats thay died from the same illnesses most all of us have / told me my blood pressure had to be 200 over 110 dead dead or brain dead from pressure well thats one way of getting rid of us. stroke heart attack/hip/arm/eyes/small brain two tumors/rib resection/arthritis all over body/back surgery/glaucoma both eyes/cancer-8 pound tumer on right kidney so if i ask for painmeds and you read this would you give me a break more vears behidd me then in front of me. One more you are going to love this /ruled by a federal judge 100% disabled/part because of blood pressure/v.a.10 per cent 128.00 a month /then they send me a letter saying if i dont pay it they will take tax money this money they say that i owe them. takes back that 128.00 dollors 4 or 5 times plus all the people that are sick should not pay one dime//have been told over to not let this go.as god IS my witness i will not go away i will never stop ask tell calling mailing bring it to the attention to every person that with the missiles and all the chemicals/the 24 on the 24 off guarding this great nation cold war hell/we all know haD A WAR STARTED WE WERE ALL DEAD/THE PEOPLE IN KENTUCKY DONT WANT THE NEW VA HOSPITAL TO BE BUILT BECAUSE THEY CANT GET HOME QUICK ENOUGH/THANK ALL OF THEM. MOST PEOPLE THAT LIVE IN THAT AREA HAVE NEVER BEEN IN THE MILITARY!!I WAS A POLICE OFFICER IN THAT AREA DIDNT MEET TOO MANY VETS THAT LIVED THERE,NOT EVEN THE OFFICERS HAD NOT BEEN THE MILITARY. WELL GOT TO GET SOME SLEEP. DON’T FORGET TO CHECK ON THE SUPERFUND.

  68. Don Mullis says:

    For the people that use Face book.
    look up Operation Stand Together you may want to look in to it.

  69. Don Mullis says:

    A newly released report from the US Dept of Health and Human Services highlights the dangers faced by so many for decades aboard US Military installations. It now officially lists Trichloroethylene, or TCE as a human carcinogen. TCE is a primary pollutant at Camp Lejeune and other Superfund Sites.

  70. TerryOlliges says:

    hello tom hope you”are feeling well;did you eat turkey.are fish”for thanksgiving? well have not been to sick having some throat trouble.some people on the site. have cancer of the throat.doctor said that food not going down right;plus bone cancer all over??cancer a ugly ugly word. but so far i have dealt with it. dont give up ask the greatest doctor in the world for help/the good lord. he will help/ give him a little time alot of people out there to take care of/ never give up and if you need someone to talk to give me a ring.1 502 612 2099. day or night dont sleep.like a lot of you. old age. ha ha hope to see this happen. for all you guys and girls. be nice to see dod to tell us they made us sick and then no copy pay. a little comp for all the times you are so so not felling good one day you go then 3 days on the couch???body hurts nose bleeds head hurts. can hear. cant see.and the two. viagra dont work. guess i just go hunten.raining here cold hi nixon thanks for calling. you call me i like to talk.well guess time to go; they caught the v.a. giving the men viagra. they said it kept them from falling out of bed at nights! god bless all of them and hang in there. i have some papers if you would like a certificate of recognition for cold war vets. It’s a nice certificate. Send me your email address and i will send the form to you. Thank for you for your service. Good Night.

  71. TerryOlliges says:

    Happy new year! Well had all my teeth pulled and chin lift, but not by choice. I now have a tumor in my left breast and need to have it cut out. Cut and sanded down lower jaw bone. Also had a large hole in neck area. have no idea/? took it off in a cage???? will let me know if cancer?one more one of the illlnesses that is caused by the TCE chemicals. The marines at camp lejune had the same cancer.

    Hello Tom, Floyd, Conrad, John, Ed, Don. Happy New Year to All.

  72. Terry Olliges says:

    Well I am officially toothless now and have lost 60lbs. A new year and a new day, 2017. I am sending out more papers to beg once more for an additional 10%. I have been taken from 14 doctors office visits by ems to the VA ER and now being harassed by yellow cab to pay the bill. The VA doctors called them to take me. ER. Now need to have left breast tumor cut out. Would appreciate it if you would call congress and ask them to look into this for me. One more thing; Congress was all over it about the water in Flint MI (which is good). Thats nice, but I wish they would also look into how long we all drink the water with all the crap they had us dump into the earth in it. In today’s world you most likely would go to jail and not pass go for that. There has got to be one good congressman or women that will help all of us. Like the bible said can you find just one? Didn’t happen there. I SAY WE ALL SEND TRUMP SOME OF OUR PAPERWORK. I HAVE A FEW LETTERS THAT CONGRESS SENT BACK STATING IT WOULD BE LOOKED INTO, Sen Donnely IS ONE OF THEM. ASK IF HE WOULD TAKE A LOOK AT MY PAPERWORK TO TELL ME WHY I CAN’T GET MORE THAN 10% WITH ALL MY TIMES IN THE HOSPITAL. HIS REPLY WAS WELL YOU GOT 10%. HOPE NO ONE ASKS HIM A REAL HARD QUESTION. WE ALL ARE GETTING THE SAME ANSWERS AND THE SAME OLD RUNAROUND. $128 DOLLORS A MONTH. JUST GOT OUR WORST ENEMIES $7 Trillion AMERICAN DOLLARS. Trump SAID HE WOULD HELP. WELL LETS SEE WHAT HE DOES. START SENDING EMAILS OR MAKE PHONECALLS. I HAVE THE NUMBER. ASK FOR HELP. MAKE A FEW CALLS. WE HAVE ASKED OUR CONGRESS FOR HELP CAN’T FIND WHERE THEY HAVE DONE ONE THING TO HELP US. SO IF ONE OF OUR CONGRESS MEN OR WOMEN READS THIS PLEASE TELL US.LET US KNOW. WE CAN HELP YOU AND YOU CAN HELP ALL OF THE RADAR MISSILE REPAIRMEN AND WOMEN. WE WERE THE BEST SECURITY THE SITES COULD ASK FOR. 24 HOURS ON 24 OFF. WHEN PEOPLE AT HOME IN THE GREAT USA SLEPT THE SKIES WERE SAFE BECAUSE OF ALL YOU. I TAKE MY HAT OFF TO ALL OF YOU! WHEN I LANDED IN LOUISVILLE I KISSED THE GROUND AND SAID I WOULD NEVER LEAVE HERE AGAIN. I DID THOUGH AND WENT TO THE MARSHALL ISLANDS CAME BACK FEET ON THE GROUND AND STILL HERE ASKING FOR A LITTLE HELP. 5 YEARS MILITARY, FROM AGE 17 TO 22, THEN 18 YRS A COP. GOD BLESS ALL!! TERRY O.

  73. Terry Olliges says:

    I received a constituent request form from Senator Joe Donnelly’s Office. If anyone wants to send me a request of your own (please keep it to one page) stating things such as what is going on with you, how long you’ve been trying to get help from the VA, etc. I will include it with the one I am sending to him. Please include your name, address, email address and phone # at the bottom of the letter. My email address is tolliges@psci.net. Please send it to me by Wednesday, February 1st. I’m hoping that if we include information from more than just myself it will let them know how serious the problem really is.

  74. Terry Olliges says:

    letters going out you have one more day this is it if you need help nows the time

  75. Terry Olliges says:

    paper work has been mailed joe donnelly a USA senator. and senator Arnold and MR Auchenbach so far have kept there word. stated they would look into the issue.ask me to give him legal right. to look into the radar missiles chenicals.and that big fat monkey ass sgt Arney.that lives on easy street.ran the fat right off my bones heres to you sgt.hello Tom
    Don,CONRAD. ED.John, FLOYD. hope all doing well.should have some type of news. real soon keep on them USA sens in your state call them sent letters do the news if we got to they have had alot of time I have letters from a year ago. The same as now. lets see well mom mom is calling. o well out of VAG. Mom is my wife, ha ha from Teeresa and big old me good night to all with our love.

  76. Terry Olliges says:

    I know five others thats not on the list.Is this top secret. or to old like the v,a, tells me i am how about it tom get up and cut the grass. or you can go fishennnn.

  77. Terry Olliges says:

    well I have been back in hospital once more. Stomach not moving – dehydrated. They took care of that for me. Senator Joe Donnelly’s office is working with us too. Teresa from his office is helping me with a current claim I have in but also trying to help all of us get recognized for the radiation and contaminates we all were exposed to. I’ll let you know the outcome. Take care and God Bless.

  78. Floyd Nixon says:

    It would help a great deal if people would just sit down and listen. We are not just making stuff up. The whole time I was at the site I never saw a radiation meter.

  79. Terry Olliges says:

    Well there might be some hope – – SENATE BILL 726. Contact your congressman and ask them to support this bill!!

    115th CONGRESS
    1st Session
    S. 726

    To require the Secretary of Defense to declassify certain documents related to incidents in which members of the Armed Forces were exposed to toxic substances.

    IN THE SENATE OF THE UNITED STATES

    March 27, 2017

    Mr. Moran (for himself and Mr. Tester) introduced the following bill; which was read twice and referred to the Committee on Armed Services

    A BILL

    To require the Secretary of Defense to declassify certain documents related to incidents in which members of the Armed Forces were exposed to toxic substances.

    Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

    SECTION 1. SHORT TITLE.

    This Act may be cited as the “Gary Deloney and John Olsen Toxic Exposure Declassification Act”.

    SEC. 2. DECLASSIFICATION BY DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE OF CERTAIN INCIDENTS OF EXPOSURE OF MEMBERS OF THE ARMED FORCES TO TOXIC SUBSTANCES.

    (a) In General.–The Secretary of Defense shall declassify documents related to any known incident in which not fewer than 100 members of the Armed Forces were exposed to a toxic substance that resulted in at least one case of a disability that a member of the medical profession has determined to be associated with that toxic
    substance.
    (b) Limitation.–The declassification required by subsection (a) shall be limited to information necessary for an individual who was potentially exposed to a toxic substance to determine the following:
    (1) Whether that individual was exposed to that toxic substance.
    (2) The potential severity of the exposure of that individual to that toxic substance.
    (3) Any potential health conditions that may have resulted from exposure to that toxic substance.
    (c) Exception.–The Secretary of Defense is not required to declassify documents if the Secretary determines that declassification of those documents would materially and immediately threaten the
    security of the United States.
    (d) Definitions.–In this section:
    (1) Armed forces.–The term “Armed Forces” has the meaning given that term in section 101 of title 10, United
    States Code.
    (2) Exposed.–The term “exposed” means, with respect to a toxic substance, that an individual came into contact with that toxic substance in a manner that could be hazardous to the health of that individual, that may include if that toxic substance was inhaled, ingested, or touched the skin or eyes.
    (3) Exposure.–The term “exposure” means, with respect to a toxic substance, an event during which an individual was exposed to that toxic substance.
    (4) Toxic substance.–The term “toxic substance” means any substance determined by the Administrator of the
    Environmental Protection Agency to be harmful to the environment or hazardous to the health of an individual if inhaled or ingested by or absorbed through the skin of that individual.

  80. Terry Olliges says:

    Continue calling your state senators and U>S>A> senators to. toxic vets OPERATION STAND TOGETHER WASHINGTON D,C, MAY 20TH 2017 WWW,OPERATION STAND TOGETHER, ORG check this out. been back in hospital once more va zorn louisville. heart like many of you. hang in there and say your night prayers. day time to god bless all t,o,

  81. floyd nixon says:

    a green road journal [feb.2017]

  82. floyd nixon says:

    a green road journal

  83. Terry Olliges says:

    Hello Floyd Tom Don James Conrad Ed. Nice day today 72. lLttle hot. Have not heard a thing? Sen Joe Donnely has been working on this and hope to hear from him soon. Sen Arnold and his asst Grant had no ideal
    about the sen bill 726. Thanks to all that helped getting info to him. Need to get this out to all. When i was in VA hospital i passed the bill out like the newspaper. Heart getting bigger because of blood pressure – 10 percent???? time to go GOD BLESS ALL

  84. floyd nixon says:

    called all the sen.and/or rep. on senate armed forces committes and told them to try and pass s-726 and s-373

  85. Terry Olliges says:

    A NEW STORY. HATS OFF TO PRESIDENT TRUMP. THE LETTERS THAT I SENT HE DID RECEIVE AND STATED THAT HE OR THEY COULD NOT HELP THE U.S. VETS.SO AFTER A 45 MIN TALK WITH (LOIS WAGNER) DEPT OF VETERANS AFFAIRS, 1-317-916-3469.NEED TO FIND OUT THE PEOPLE THAT FILED ON THE AGENT ORANGE AND THE MARINES WHO FILED ON THE CHEMICALS AT CAMP LEJEUNE. –HOW DID YOU GO ABOUT GETTING THIS RECOGNIZED. WHAT DO WE NEED TO DO TO GET THE RADIATION AND HAZARDOUS CHEMICALS RECOGNIZED BY THE VA? SHOULD FILE A LAW DISAGREEMENT I HATE THE WORD LAWSUIT.BUT APPEARS THAT MAY BE THE ONLY WAY. GOT TURNED DOWN ONCE MORE?APPEALLLLLLLLLL A BIG JOKE OR THE NEWS PAPER TV SUPERFUND JOKE TELL YOUR CONGRESS. DOCTORS. NEWS TOLD THAT THEY HAD NO TIES WITH THE FUNDS? GOVERMENT NO MONEY PAID OUT TO THAT FUUD ????? WILL LET YOU ALL KNOW WE NEED YOUR HELP PLEASE… DO WE NEED A LAWYER NO CLASS ACTION GET YOU YOUR LAWYER THANKS MR; TRUMP FOR YOU ARE A MAN OF YOUR WORD SIR BUT I STILL KNOW THAT YOU CAN HELP THOUSANDS OF MILITARY PEOPLE MADE SICK. THERE AIN’T A THING MR TRUMP YOU SIR CANT DO FAMILY AND I ASK YOU TO PLEASE CALL 1-502-612-2099.

  86. Terry Olliges says:

    Here is some information for those interested. This has something to do with the chemicals and radiation we were exposed to in Germany. Germans suing. Maybe we should too since we are not getting a response from VA regarding this.

    SourceURL:http://www.cnsnews.com/news/article/german-ex-soldiers-sue-us-firms-over-nato-radar-radiation-claimsGerman Ex-Soldiers To Sue U.S. Firms Over NATO Radar Radiation Claims

    German Ex-Soldiers To Sue U.S. Firms Over NATO Radar Radiation Claims

    By R. Raghavendra | July 7, 2008 | 8:11 PM EDT

    Berlin (CNSNews.com) – Hundreds of former German soldiers are suing their Defense Ministry for $350 million in damages, claiming they contracted cancer from exposure to damaging rays from U.S.-built radar equipment forming part of NATO’s defense systems along the erstwhile Iron Curtain.

    Reiner Geulen, an attorney representing the ex-servicemen, said a separate lawsuit would be filed in the U.S. against the manufacturers of the radar systems.

    The plaintiffs claim to have developed various types of cancer, including leukemia and testicular cancer, blaming the diseases on constant exposure to x-ray radiation while working on the radar systems between the late 1950s and early 1980s.

    Lawsuits are likely to be filed in the United States in May on behalf of some 400 soldiers, although the law firm has refused to divulge the names of the companies to be targeted.

    The lawyers argue that the equipment was imperfectly set up, and lacked shielding devices.

    It is widely known here that radar systems used in Germany were manufactured by U.S. companies like Raytheon, General Electric, Lockheed Martin and Lucent.

    So far, cases have been filed in district courts in Bonn, on behalf of four former West German soldiers, and in Frankfurt am Oder on behalf of two former East German soldiers.

    Geulen described the six as “test cases,” saying any court rulings would apply to the remaining clients.

    He said his firm represents a total of 773 plaintiffs, mostly former soldiers or surviving relatives in cases of those who have died. The majority served in the former West German army, the Bundeswehr.

    Geulen alleges the German military knew about the radiation risk, but did not warn its soldiers working on the systems, nor take any precautions, in violation of safety regulations.

    The radar systems formed part of NATO defenses along the borders with East Bloc nations, to monitor troop and flight movements. Some were dismantled after the allegations of cancer surfaced in late 1980s, but a few systems are still operational. Precautions have now been taken to ensure the safety of soldiers working on them.

    In mid-2001, Defense Minister Rudolf Scharping announced an investigation into the allegations of a radiation-cancer link.

    Some 1,560 Germans then filed applications claiming to have suffered from cancer after being exposed to the radiation. Out of the nearly 500 applications since processed by the ministry, in only eight cases have officials agreed there was a link, and that the soldiers concerned were eligible for a pension increase.

    Out of 408 applications filed by former East German soldiers or their survivors, the defense ministry has taken a decision in 77 of the cases, and ruled that none of them had developed cancer because of exposure to x-ray radiation.

    The plaintiffs are suing for a minimum of 60,000 euros (about $52,400) each, while children of soldiers, who have been born with deformities allegedly linked to exposure, are seeking payouts of at least 500,000 euros ($436,700) each.

  87. Terry Olliges says:

    I was advised by President Trump’s office that they could not help us (he wished he could but..) however President Obama signed the Camp Lejeune water contamination bill in 2012 called the Burr’s Bill to help them get medical and compensation.

  88. Terry Olliges says:

    For those interested there is a website on Civilian Exposure. Go to http://www.civilianexposure.org. A lot of interesting articles.

  89. floyd nixon says:

    why is that one president can help us.the other one says he cannot.

    • Larry Francis says:

      Floyd,

      Really? President Obama was actually for the veteran. Trump, well you just asked the 64 million dollar question. A Nike Radiation Register would cost the United States government money. You figure it out?

      Larry Francis

  90. John E Schappert says:

    I served on a Nike Site NY49 in Brooklyn NY.We were exposed to TCE, PCE numerous other chlorinated cleaning agents and solvents for 3 yrs years We practically bathed in the stuff

    3 of us stayed in touch. one has had kidney cancer with kidney removed as well as prostate cancer, another has had thyroid cancer and prostate cancer and I have had severe sleep apnea, anxiety/depression etc. A fourth person from the same unit I tried to contact 2 yrs ago had died from esophegal(sp) cancer that spread to his back. So out of 4 of us 3 have had cancer and me other issues. When looking at just what health problems TCE can cause all the cancers and my depression etc are right at the top of the list of problems TCE has and can cause.
    Anyone with the same problems please contact me at email jschapp2@juno.com

    • Terry Olliges says:

      John, call me, Terry Olliges, at 502-612-2099. Would like to talk to you. I have Information about chemicals, radiation, etc.

  91. Terry Olliges says:

    News ???Trump to nominate RAYTHEON VP, Gulf War Vet as next Army secretary. Vincent Viola graduated in 1986 from military school. little more. In Fevruary, he withdrew his name for the post citing strict defense dept rules concerning his family businesses. Raytheon is on of the largest suppliers for the US DOD. Mr Viola, we would like to know if you would testify that the radar equipment and other equipment built by Raytheon made thousands of US military veterans sick. We can prove these allegations and we are many. After all, you are a veteran too. Thanks, Terry

  92. Terry Olliges says:

    CORRECTION – – Mark Esper is the correct name for the person President Trump is nominating for the next Army secretary.
    News ???Trump to nominate RAYTHEON VP, Gulf War Vet as next Army secretary. MARK ESPER graduated in 1986 from military school. little more. In February, he withdrew his name for the post citing strict defense dept rules concerning his family businesses. Raytheon is on of the largest suppliers for the US DOD. Mr Esper, would you have any input/knowledge that the radar equipment and other equipment built by Raytheon made thousands of US military veterans sick. We have proof of these allegations and we are many. After all, you are a veteran too. Thanks, Terry

  93. Dennis Lopez says:

    Greetings…I served as a 16C at PH75, Edgemont, PA in 1967. I am curious if any ARADCOM vets can help me verify the incredible noise level within the ABAR unit? My hearing issues started there and have plagued me ever since. I now am battling with the VA over my hearing loss. Thanks for any help you can give me.

  94. floyd nixon says:

    look at[military.com] va.to decide on new agent orange ailments by nov.1 RIGHT SIDE OF PAGE

  95. Terry Olliges says:

    dennis call 1 502 612 2099 ask for terry o

  96. floyd nixon says:

    denied by va. for everything new number. 443 754 0638

  97. Terry Olliges says:

    hello. well looks like almost all of use are getting turned down /??, time to sent letters out to are state and usa senators and file a few law suits may help turn down turn well. do vou know two people that got comp send letters to the white house,tell the man tell Trump, i went to my chain of command.that opened the door,,, good night GOD bless. TERRY A SMALL WORM/COLD WORD BLUE BIRD

  98. Don Mullis says:

    You may want to read this Nike people.

    Army-Hercules Nuclear Missile workers were required to wear ionizing radiation badges – VA case
    The Appellant and her son and daughter
     ATTORNEY FOR THE BOARD
     P. Childers, Counsel
     
    INTRODUCTION
     The Veteran served on active duty from April 1962 to April 1965. He died in April 2005. The appellant is his surviving spouse.

    This matter comes before the Board of Veterans’ Appeals (Board) on appeal from a June 2005 rating decision by the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Regional Office (RO) in Waco, Texas, which denied entitlement to service connection for cause of the Veteran’s death, entitlement to dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC) under the provisions of 38 U.S.C.A. § 1318, and entitlement to accrued benefits.

    In January 2009, the appellant and her son and daughter, accompanied by the appellant’s representative, testified before the undersigned Veterans Law Judge at a Travel Board hearing in Waco, Texas. A transcript of that hearing is in the claims file.

    In a decision in April 2010, the Board denied the claim of entitlement to dependency and indemnity compensation (DIC) under the provisions of 38 U.S.C.A. § 1318; and remanded the issue of entitlement to service connection for the cause of the Veteran’s death, to include as due to exposure to Agent Orange, ionizing radiation, and asbestos for further procedural development; namely, provision to the appellant of notice in accordance with Hupp v. Nicholson, 21 Vet. App. 342, 352-53 (2007). The requested notice was sent in August 2010, so no further action to ensure compliance with the Board’s remand directives is required. (Stegall v. West, 11 Vet. App. 268 (1998). However, review of the record reveals that additional evidentiary development is warranted.

    The appeal is REMANDED to the RO via the Appeals Management Center (AMC), in Washington, D.C. VA will notify the appellant if further action is required.
     
    REMAND

    In 1965 the Veteran separated from the U.S. Army after three years of active duty service. In or around February 2005 he was diagnosed with metastatic pancreatic carcinoma, and in March 2005 he filed for service connection for pancreatic cancer on the grounds that he was exposed to electronic radiation from Hercules Missile Radar, and to ionizing radiation from Hercules Missile warheads. In correspondence in April 2005 he reported that he worked around nuclear warheads in the performance of his military duties, and was required to wear film badges at the launching site. He stated that he was an expert Missileman and could do all types of tests, including nuclear and conventional; and added that nuclear and conventional warheads were armed, ready, and tested daily during the Cuban Missile Crisis. He also wrote that he may have been exposed to radiation as a first responder at the scene of a helicopter crash on Fort Wolters, which he said was carrying top secret radar and frequency testing equipment for nuclear devices. In addition to the foregoing he noted that the buildings at Fort Wolters were built with asbestos, and stated that asbestos had been proven to cause cancer.

    In April 2005 the Veteran died from his recently diagnosed pancreatic cancer (before his claim for service connection was resolved), and in May 2005 the appellant filed for DIC benefits.

    In a rating decision in June 2005, the RO denied the appellant’s claim for DIC. In so doing the RO noted that the Veteran’s pending claim for service connection was also denied. The appellant appealed the denial of her claim for DIC benefits.

    In November 2005 a military buddy wrote that the Veteran was present when a defoliant was sprayed near the Integrated Fire Control station on Fort Wolters during the summer of 1964.

    During a January 2008 Travel Board hearing the appellant asserted that the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer may have been caused by exposure to radiation, herbicides, and asbestos during his service.

    The Veteran’s DD-214 confirms that he was assigned to the 4th Missile battalion, 562 Artillery, USARADCOM; that he had successfully completed CBR (Chemical, Biological and Radiological) training; and that he was authorized to wear, among other decorations, a Marksman Badge with Missile Bar (IFC (Integrated Fire Control)) and a 1st Class Missile Man (Herc) Badge. The evidence of record also includes two Letters of Commendation dated in June 1964 relating to the Veteran’s first responder actions on the scene of a helicopter crash at Fort Wolters, Texas, on April 14, 1964.

    An April 2005 Personnel Information Exchange System (PIES) request by the RO for a DD-1141 was unsuccessful, as was a June 2006 request by the RO to the U.S. Army Aviation and Missile Command for its record of the Veteran’s exposure to ionizing radiation; and the claims file has been documented accordingly. However, as there is uncontroverted evidence that the Veteran worked in close proximity to missiles throughout his military service, additional efforts should be taken to ascertain whether he was exposed to ionizing radiation during service. See 38 C.F.R. §§ 3.309(d)(3)(E) and 3.311(a)(2)(iii). Remand in accordance with 38 C.F.R. § 3.159(c)(2) for the Veteran’s complete Official Military Personnel File is therefore warranted. A written request for a record of the Veteran’s occupational exposure to radiation should also be sent to the Commander at the U.S. Army Medical Command at Ft. Sam Houston. See M21-1MR, Part IV, Subpart ii, 1.C.9.e.

    In addition to the foregoing, in a letter in January 2009 a VA physician stated that the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer could be related to exposure to radiation, and exposure to Agent Orange; and in November 2010 the appellant submitted excerpts from an August 1993 PRELIMINARY ASSESSMENT REPORT FOR FORT JACOB F. WOLTERS, compiled by Applied Geosciences and Environmental Management Section for the National Guard Bureau, Army Directorate in Aberdeen, Maryland, which stated that herbicides had been used on Fort Wolters to maintain vegetation free areas around the perimeters, primarily for fire control. The report also noted that asbestos had been used, during the years when Fort Wolters was constructed, as building/equipment insulation material, and as a component of some construction materials, including floor and ceiling tiles and wall siding.

    38 U.S.C.A. § 5103A(a) provides that the Secretary shall make reasonable efforts to assist a claimant in obtaining evidence necessary to substantiate the claimant’s claim for a benefits under a law administered by the Secretary.

    Although pancreatic cancer is not listed as one of the presumptive diseases associated with herbicide exposure under 38 C.F.R. § 3.309(e), a claimant is not precluded from establishing service connection with proof of direct causation. See Combee v. Brown, 34 F.3d 1039, 1042 (Fed. Cir. 1994). As there is medical evidence in this case of a nexus between pancreatic cancer and Agent Orange, efforts should be undertaken to corroborate the appellant’s allegation that the Veteran was exposed to herbicides during service. 38 U.S.C.A. § 5103A(a). An opinion should then be obtained as to whether the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer was incurred during service, or is related to some incident of his service, such as Agent Orange exposure, if confirmed. Id.

    Additionally, as the appellant alleges that the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer may have been secondary to asbestos exposure during service and has presented prima facie evidence of asbestos on Fort Wolters, and inasmuch as the matter is already being sent for a medical opinion on causation, this theory of entitlement should also be addressed.

    Finally, in argument and evidence submitted in July 2012, the appellant’s representative suggested that there may be a link between the Veteran’s obesity and his development of pancreatic cancer. As service treatment records do in fact confirm that the Veteran struggled with exogenous obesity during service, this alternative theory of causation should be addressed by the VA examiner on remand.

    Accordingly, the case is REMANDED for the following action:

    1. Request the Veteran’s Official Military Personnel File and associate these records with the claims file.

    To the extent that the request for these records is unsuccessful, the claims file must contain documentation of the attempts made. The appellant and her representative should also be informed of the negative results, and be given the opportunity to submit the Veteran’s service personnel records.

    2. Send a written request for a record of the Veteran’s occupational exposure to radiation to the Commander, U.S. Army Medical Command, Attn: MCPO-SA, 2748 Worth Road, Suite 25, Ft. Sam Houston, TX 78234-6025.

    3. Contact the appropriate agency/official for corroboration of the witness’s report that herbicides were sprayed on Fort Jacob F. Wolters in 1964, in the field in front of the Integrated Fire Control (IFC) area, in order to provide an emergency landing field for the Helicopter Warrant Officer candidates.

    4. Contact the appropriate U.S. Army official for verification as to whether asbestos was used in the construction of buildings, and manufacture of equipment, located at Fort Jacob F. Wolters from 1962 to 1965; especially, as regards the IFC facility(s) and equipment, and housing on Fort Wolters.

    5. After completion of Action # 2, if a negative response is received, review the Veteran’s Official Military Personnel File to see if it contains a DD-1141 and/or some other proof (such as the Veteran’s wearing of film badges) of radiation exposure; make an official finding; and document the claims file accordingly. Then, notify the appellant and her representative regarding this finding.

    6. After completion of steps 1, 2, and 5, if evidence of radiation exposure is found, get a dose estimate.

    7. After completion of steps 1 through 6, send the claims file and a copy of this remand for review by a VA Compensation and Pension examiner. Following a thorough review of the claims file, the examiner must provide an opinion on the following questions:

    (a) whether it is at least as likely as not (i.e., a 50 percent probability or more) that the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer was incurred during active duty service; or, if it was not incurred in service, whether it is related to some incident of active duty service, such as exposure to ionizing radiation, or exposure to herbicides/Agent Orange, if either such occurrence is determined by the AMC/RO to be confirmed.

    (b) whether it is at least as likely as not (i.e., a 50 percent probability or more) that the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer is related to exposure to asbestos from 1962 to 1965.

    (c) whether it is at least as likely as not (i.e., a 50 percent probability or more) that the Veteran’s pancreatic cancer is related to his weight during service.

    The examiner must review and discuss the Veteran’s complete medical history and provide a complete rationale in support of each opinion.

    8. Then, readjudicate the appellant’s claims of service connection for the cause of the Veteran’s death and entitlement to accrued benefits. If the claim remains denied, issue a Supplemental Statement of the Case, which addresses all evidence associated with the claims file since the last Supplemental Statement of the Case, as well as all relevant law. An appropriate period of time should be allowed for response.

    No action is required by the appellant until she receives further notice; however, she may present additional evidence or argument upon her own volition while the case is in remand status. Kutscherousky v. West, 12 Vet. App. 369 (1999).

    These claims must be afforded expeditious treatment. The law requires that all claims that are remanded by the Board of Veterans’ Appeals or by the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims for additional development or other appropriate action must be handled in an expeditious manner. See 38 U.S.C.A. §§ 5109B, 7112 (West Supp. 2011).
     
    _________________________________________________
    ROBERT C. SCHARNBERGER
    Veterans Law Judge, Board of Veterans’ Appeals

    Under 38 U.S.C.A. § 7252 (West 2002), only a decision of the Board of Veterans’ Appeals is appealable to the United States Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims. This remand is in the nature of a preliminary order and does not constitute a decision of the Board on the merits of your appeal. 38 C.F.R. § 20.1100(b) (2011).

    • Larry Francis says:

      Don,

      I was in the Navy and none of us ever saw a radiation dosimeter where I was stationed at and I worked on a Nike Ajax system for 3 years. Pinecastle Elecronic Warfare Range Astor, Fl 72-76

      Larry Francis PhD student, MPA, BAIS, ASET
      TD2 Larry Francis

      The ack radar (LOPAR) was 50 feet from where I sat every day, but the high voltage vacuum tubes were in the vans giving off x-rays everyday, all day. That is ionizing radiation. I have prostate cancer, depression, neuropathy, hypogonadism, low sperm count, beginnings of cataracts, glaucoma, sound familiar?

      682-444-5997

  99. Don Mullis says:

    you may want to read this Nike people.

    Military Veteran of unknown job title VA claim of exposure to radiation
    This Veterans Board of Appeals case for radiation exposure is worthy of note due to the veteran having a “Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) informed the VA Under Secretary for Benefits” assessment of how much radiation the VA considers causes medical issues. 6.3 REMS seems the bottom limit which triggers winning a VA claim..

    BVA9509508
    DOCKET NO. 90-26 477 ) DATE
    )
    )

    On appeal from the decision of the
    Department of Veterans Affairs Regional Office in Nashville,
    Tennessee

    THE ISSUES

    1. Entitlement to an effective date earlier than October 1,1992, for service connection for the cause of the veteran’s death.

    2. Entitlement to service connection for adenoid cystic carcinoma due to exposure to ionizing radiation for the purpose of accrued benefits.

    REPRESENTATION

    Appellant represented by: The American Legion

    ATTORNEY FOR THE BOARD

    Nancy S. Kettelle, Counsel

    INTRODUCTION

    The veteran served on active duty from January 1955 to January 1958.

    This matter came to the Board of Veterans’ Appeals (Board) on appeal from a March 1990 rating decision of the Department of Veteran’s Affairs (VA) Regional Office (RO) in Nashville, Tennessee. The case was last remanded by the Board in November 1992.

    REMAND

    The record shows that the veteran died in January 1990 from the effects of adenoid cystic carcinoma, a form of salivary gland cancer. While the case was in remand status, the RO granted service connection for the cause of the veteran’s death, effective from October 1, 1992. The grant of benefits was made under the provisions of 38 U.S.C.A. § 1112(c), as amended by Pub. L. No. 102-578 of Oct. 30, 1992. After returning the case to the Under Secretary for Benefits, who obtained an opinion from the Under Secretary for Health, the RO denied the remaining claims, and the appellant, the veteran’s widow, continued her appeal.

    The Board notes that in a December 1989 memorandum, the VA Associate Deputy Chief Medical Director based his review of the veteran’s case on a maximal radiation dose of 4.9 rem gamma. In a September 1993 letter, the Defense Nuclear Agency (DNA) informed the VA Under Secretary for Benefits that the radiation dose assessment for the veteran had been completed. In his September 1993 memorandum to the VA Under Secretary for Health requesting review of the case under 38 C.F.R. § 3.311b (now 38 C.F.R. § 3.311), the Under Secretary for Benefits noted that based on DNA’s September 1993 letter, the veteran’s total external radiation dose was 4.6 rem with an upper bound of 6.3 rem gamma. The Under Secretary for Health responded in memoranda dated in February 1994 and June 1994. However, in these memoranda the Under Secretary for Health referred only to the veteran’s total film badge readings of 4.345 rem, and apparently did not consider the upper bound of 6.3 rem gamma for the combination of recorded and calculated exposure for the veteran reported by DNA in September 1993. 38 C.F.R. § 3.311(a) (1994) provides that when dose estimates are reported as a range of doses to which a veteran may have been exposed, exposure at the highest level of the dose range will be presumed. Under the circumstances, the Under Secretary for Health should be
    requested to review the case under 3.311, using 6.3 rem gamma as the upper bound for the veteran’s total external radiation dose.

    In view of the medical opinions previously offered by the appellant that were based on DNA’s earlier radiation dose estimates for the veteran, the RO should provide the
    appellant an opportunity to submit updated analyses should she choose to do so.

    Accordingly, the case is REMANDED to the RO for the following
    actions:

    1. The RO should provide the appellant an additional copy of DNA’s September 2, 1993, letter with attachments, and provide her the opportunity to submit updated medical analyses or any other evidence or argument she believes may support her claims.

    2. Thereafter, the RO should undertake any indicated development and then again forward the case to the VA Under Secretary for Benefits for appropriate action under 38 C.F.R. § 3.311, to include an opinion from the VA Under Secretary for Health as to whether it is at least as likely as not that the veteran’s salivary gland cancer was caused by radiation exposure in service. The VA Under Secretary for Health should be explicitly requested to review the case under 38 C.F.R. § 3.311, with consideration of 6.3 rem  gamma as the veteran’s total external radiation dose.

    3. Then, the RO should review the record in its entirety and readjudicate the issues of entitlement to an effective date earlier than October 1, 1992, for service connection for the
    cause of the veteran’s death, and entitlement to service connection for adenoid cystic carcinoma due to exposure to ionizing radiation for the purpose of accrued benefits.

    If the benefits sought on appeal are not granted to the appellant’s satisfaction, the RO should issue a Supplemental Statement of the Case, and the appellant and her representative should be provided an opportunity to respond. The case should then be returned to the Board for further appellate consideration, if otherwise in order. By this
    REMAND, the Board intimates no opinion as to any final outcome warranted. No action is required of the appellant until she is otherwise notified by the RO.

    J. J. SCHULE
    Member, Board of Veterans’ Appeals

    (CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE)

    The Board of Veterans’ Appeals Administrative Procedures
    Improvement Act, Pub. L. No. 103-271, § 6, 108 Stat. 740, ___
    (1994), permits a proceeding instituted before the Board to
    be assigned to an individual member of the Board for a
    determination. This proceeding has been assigned to an
    individual member of the Board.

    Under 38 U.S.C.A. § 7252 (West 1991), only a decision of the
    Board of Veterans’ Appeals is appealable to the United States
    Court of Veterans Appeals. This remand is in the nature of a
    preliminary order and does not constitute a decision of the
    Board on the merits of your appeal. 38 C.F.R. § 20.1100(b)
    (1994).

  100. Don Mullis says:

    Gama Radiation Penetration
     http://www.radiation-scott.org/radsource/1-0.htm
     
    For radiological incident scenarios, one mainly deals with the following types of radiation: (1) alpha radiation, (2) beta radiation, (3) gamma rays, and (4) neutrons.
    Alpha Radiation
    Alpha radiation is made up of helium atoms stripped of electrons. The stripped atoms are called alpha particles.
    Emitted alpha particles are positively charged. They can be stopped by a piece of paper and pose a concern mainly when emitted inside the body.
    Alpha emitters are isotopes that emit alpha particles. When the alpha emitter is on the surface of the skin, the dead layer of the skin adequately protects the body from harm by trapping the emitted alpha particles. However, if the skin has a wound, the alpha emitter can enter the body through the wound and cause harm.
    Beta Radiation
    Beta radiation is made up of negatively charged electrons. These electrons are called beta particles.
    Beta emitters are isotopes that emit beta particles. Beta particles can pass through the dead layer of the skin and cause harm to the body.
    Clothing can provide some protection from beta radiation injury to humans when the beta emitter lands on the outside of the clothing. Beta emitters that are inhaled into the lung or ingested into the gastrointestinal tract can cause harm.
    Gamma Rays
    Gamma rays have no charge or mass. Gamma rays can go through the entire body and can damage multiple organs.
    Gamma emitters are isotopes that emit gamma rays. Gamma emitters that deposit on the outside of the body and those taken inside the body both can cause harm. Clothing provides little protection from gamma rays.
    Neutrons
    Neutrons have mass but no charge. Neutrons can penetrate deep into the body, and while doing so, can produce gamma rays through their interaction with tissue atoms. Thus, all neutron exposures involve some gamma rays. Clothing provides essentially no protection from neutrons.
    Figure 1.1 shows the relative penetrating power of different radiations.
    FIGURE 1.1

    People are exposed to radiation in mainly two modes:
    From radiation sources outside the body (external exposure).
    From radioactive substances that are inhaled or ingested into the body (internal exposure).
    Figure 1.3 shows the external and internal models of exposure. Radioisotopes taken into the body deposit in and irradiated different tissue depending on their chemical properties.
    FIGURE 1.3
     

    Radiation sources can also enter the body via wounds.
    There are many different radiation exposure scenarios that can be evaluated. Some examples follow:
    External exposure from relatively distant radiation sources (e.g., neutrons and/or gamma rays)
    External exposure from nearby radioactive soil
    External exposure from radioactive contamination on the outside of the body
    Internal exposure from inhaled radioactive substances
    Internal exposure from ingested radioactive substances
    Combinations of the above
    The radiation exposures may be brief as during a nuclear detonation or protracted (i.e., spread over an extended period) as could arise after inhaling or ingesting radioactive substances released from a nuclear accident or radiological weapon.
    1.2 Nuclear Workplace
    The nuclear workplace includes occupational settings such as nuclear power plants, nuclear weapons production facilities, nuclear medicine-related facilities, and radiation therapy facilities. Many workers are routinely exposed to radiation in such facilities. However, their radiation exposures are usually strictly controlled to avoid harmful effects of irradiation. 

    • Larry Francis says:

      Don,

      What I see forming up is a lawsuit against the VA for discrimination. They provide benefits for US Coast Guard LORAN veterans when the systems were designed with high voltage vacuum tubes in 1946 and the Nike Ajax system was designed in 1949. Same technology. The LORAN stations all had to retrofitted with lead shielding. I am on the hunt for a good lawyer in Federal District Court. I think we have a basis for a class action lawsuit against the VA for discrimination due to age. They cannot discriminate against us because of our age. They try to say the things that are wrong with us are a result of old age. Every normal person knows radiation illness can take decades to manifest itself. To my knowledge there is no Nike radiation Registry like the LORAN Registry? Why not.

      Larry Francis

    • Larry Francis says:

      Don,

      To my knowledge the radiation registries have to be forced to be created on the VA, either by presidential executive order (think Camp Lujune, Obama) or Congressional act. I was told by my VSO there may be a Nike AjaX Radiation Registry. I don’t think he knows what he is talking about, or we would not be having these issues of being turned down for disability.

      Larry Francis

      P.S. I am beyond mad about this. I will never give up seeking justice, for myself and all of those of us that suffer and have died. My roommate in the Navy did not even make 33 years old, died of a brain tumor. VA gave his widow NOTHING. What GOD was just handing out brain tumors that day?

      I intend to write and get published my dissertation about this subject next year.

  101. Larry Francis says:

    ED,
    You are just plain wrong about non-ionizing radiation not having negative effects on humans. You might want to take a look at this new study in 2017 in China. Non-ionizing radiation does affect the brain.

    https://mmrjournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40779-017-0139-0

    Larry Francis PhD Student, MPA, BAIS
    Nike Ajax Veteran

    • Don Mullis says:

      ED
      Per the VA.gov web site
      Radiation

      There are two broad types of radiation, non-ionizing and ionizing. Ionizing radiation sends out extremely high energy, which may pose a health risk.

      Ionizing radiation exposure comes from a variety of sources, including nuclear weapons testing or other activities during military service.

      Facts About Radiation
      Radiation is energy that comes from a source and travels through space. When this energy passes into the body, either by penetrating skin or being swallowed or inhaled, it may be harmful.

      Whether the radiation is ionizing or non-ionizing will influence the health risks.

      Ionizing radiation
      Ionizing radiation is the high-energy radiation that causes most of the concerns about radiation exposure during military service.

      Ionizing radiation contains enough energy to remove an electron (ionize) from an atom or molecule and to damage DNA in cells.
      Sources of ionizing radiation during military service include:
      Nuclear weapons handling and detonation
      Weapons and other military equipment made with depleted uranium
      Radioactive material
      Calibration and measurement sources
      X-rays

      Non-ionizing radiation
      Non-iodizing radiation is low-energy radiation that includes radiation from sources such as sunlight, microwaves, radio frequencies, radar and sonar.

  102. Larry Francis says:

    For everyone here. The way to win this is with ionizing radiation for now. The vacuum tubes with plate voltages over 17KV in the Nike Ajax radar van and control van give off x-ray’s with is ionizing radiation.

    I am going in on Nov 27 for my radiation exam

    Larry Francis PhD student, MPA, BAIS, ASET
    Nike Ajax Veteran 72-76
    TD2 Larry Francis Pinecastle Electronic Warfare Range, Astor FL.

  103. Don Mullis says:

    The US government quickly learned during and after World War II that RF/microwave radiation permanently damages eye tissues and denigrates eyesight. This became obvious as many radar technicians of that era developed serious eye pathologies, including retina damage and inoperable cataracts. By 1963, Dr. Milton Zaret, working at New York University, had collected copious information on human occupational cataracts. He found that electronic and communications workers exposed to infrared or intense heat developed cataracts on the front of the lens. But workers who suffered repeated microwave irradiation at non-thermal intensities developed cataracts on the posterior surface of the lens: “Zaret discovered that such microwave damage manifested itself early on as a roughening of the posterior eye surface and that the victim might experience misty vision for years before the actual cataract formed.” [10] Dr. Zaret’s research was criticized and minimized by the military-industrial complex which, even in his day, was gearing up for the universal microwave assault we all suffer today.
    Microwave-induced cataracts are different than other types of hereditary, metabolic and senile cataracts. Microwave cataracts are known as subcapsular cataracts at the posterior of the lens. [11] Subcapsular cataracts results in glare and blurriness of vision; many are inoperable.
    A person who damages his eye lens forfeits proper eye focus and image quality. A 1994 US Air Force study reported: “Clinical studies indicate that exposure to RF/MW radiation causes physiological damage to the eye that can result in loss of sight. It has been observed that irradiation causes the formation of cataracts in the lens of the eye….The lens of the eye appears to be most susceptible to RF/MW radiation at frequencies between 1-10 gigahertz. For this frequency range, it has been observed that the lens fibers will suffer irreversible damage to a greater extent than other ocular elements.

  104. MARK PEARSON says:

    I was a 24 u 20 at Fort Bliss and was always in the beam of the hi power to check out the system everyday, just what did that do to me. I could feel it and see my hair stand up.

  105. Terry Olliges says:

    Hello Don, Tom, Floyd, Conrad, and Ed. VA is a mess. I have talked to many Vets who have been told no, no and on and on. I was in the VA hospital 8 times and they did nothing. I sent a letter to President Trump and received a call saying he got it but nothing he could do. I don’t think he actually saw it and there is much he could do to help us. Senator Joe Donnelly has not helped us although he would like to hear from you. If you care to call him is number is 202-224-4814 or you can contact his assistant, Teresa Petry, at 317-226-5555. Keep on trying guys. Do not give up. Thanks, Terry

  106. Larry Francis says:

    Terry,

    The VA rating system exists to provide cover for the sins of the DOD. The DOD knows the Nike system is a mankiller, but will not admit it. The VA makes me want to throwup.

    Larry

    • Larry Francis says:

      Terry,

      Look up AD273787. My case has been moved to Jackson Miss, they are now asking for radiation illness medical treatment records. I have lots. Depression, cataracts, Soft bones (Ostomalycia), borderline diabetes, low testosterone, prostate cancer, hypertension, sleep apnea, chronic bronchitis, COPD, lung scarring, enlarged heart, GERD, and the list goes on. At least they want info still. I think I am wasting my time, but they messed up my back when the did the fusion on my back and I have them cold on 38 USC 2251 for that.

      Look up AD273787 on the internet, very scary. We are dead men walking.

      Larry

  107. Don Mullis says:

    They may help you get a copy of your RAD Badge reading for your VA claim.

    RAD BADGE
    Call Bruce Murray DTRA 703 767-3162 or Margerre 703 735-3398 works under Bruce and by the way The like us and do not know what to do with us. Oh well the truth will come out !

  108. Don Mullis says:

    on Facebook group name is Enewetek Atoll Clean-up Project Vet Some of you may have work their. You may want to check it out.

  109. Don Mullis says:

    Some of you may want to go read this https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/books/NBK218706/

  110. Larry Francis says:

    Proof that Radar will kill you, horribly, a study by GE for the Army Material Command. The Nike Ajax is included. Published by the dtic.mil

    Look up on the internet:

    AD273787

    http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&ved=0ahUKEwjiuebm0LjZAhXl3YMKHcLdBE4QFggpMAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.dtic.mil%2Fdtic%2Ftr%2Ffulltext%2Fu2%2F273787.pdf&usg=AOvVaw3mDglcKrlzzXqylCOA_l3O

  111. Don mullis says:

    some of you may like to look at this web site

    https://www.toxicdocs.org/

  112. Don Mullis says:

    CHEMICAL CONTAMINANTS AND HUMAN DISEASE: A SUMMARY OF EVIDENCE

    http://accas.info/wp-content/uploads/2017/02/CHE_Toxicants_and_Disease_Database.18304744.pdf

  113. Mark Ferguson says:

    I served at B-4-65 Malibu Oct 1972 – May 1974 LA-78
    D-2-44 Bon Do Ri S Korea May 1974 – Oct 1975 Camp Huston
    B-2-52 Key Largo Oct 75 – May 1977
    D-5-6 Hontheim Germany May 1977 – April 18 1979

    I currently suffer from tinnitus, hearing loss, and have been diagnosed with cataracts

  114. Don Mullis says:

    TCE information
    web site https://ehp.niehs.nih.gov/1205879/

  115. Don Mullis says:

    you may like to see this also.

    https://www.benefits.va.gov/warms/bookc.asp

  116. Don Mullis says:

    The US government quickly learned during and after World War II that RF/microwave radiation permanently damages eye tissues and denigrates eyesight. This became obvious as many radar technicians of that era developed serious eye pathologies, including retina damage and inoperable cataracts. By 1963, Dr. Milton Zaret, working at New York University, had collected copious information on human occupational cataracts. He found that electronic and communications workers exposed to infrared or intense heat developed cataracts on the front of the lens. But workers who suffered repeated microwave irradiation at non-thermal intensities developed cataracts on the posterior surface of the lens: “Zaret discovered that such microwave damage manifested itself early on as a roughening of the posterior eye surface and that the victim might experience misty vision for years before the actual cataract formed.” [10] Dr. Zaret’s research was criticized and minimized by the military-industrial complex which, even in his day, was gearing up for the universal microwave assault we all suffer today.

  117. Gil Dewart says:

    With the current interest in “blue light” effects of computer screens, etc., it could be worth looking into the possible effects on our radar operators.

  118. Terry Olliges says:

    Well back for more. Hello. I got turned down once more. hope you do better than me but still going to hammer on.well hell most of the people / ? are dead. on this site they are just going away. don’t let them rich people steal from u tell them. give money away that money they gave to iran? Could have helped alot of VETS.and it’s not their bank account” talk about putting folks in jail. World gone to hell. cop most most my life. WE are in a bad way.But hang in there.
    life is like a dream. Been dreaming 8 years that someone would take time to look into the reasons VA keeps turning vets down? Watch 5 fingers of death, help us don’t say you are IF YOU ARE NOT … WELL i got a cure. and the pen is mightier than the knife. GOOD BLESS.DON TOM ED CONRAD JOHN can u hear.b b b ha ha TERRY AND FAMILY

  119. IN HOSP RECENTLY. TWO MORE TIMES. VA STATES BLOOD PRESSURE MUST BE 200 OVER 110 BEFORE YOU CAN GET INCREASED BENEFITS big joke AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION SAYS YOU WOULD DIE. VA DOCTORS STATE YOU WOULD TAKES A SMART PERSON TO DO THIS PASS A LAW LIKE THIS I HAVE HAD BP LIKE THIS 200 PLUS ADMIT AT VA HEART ATTACK STROKE AND A LOT MORE WHAT THE HELL? ALL MY BONES ARE FALLING APART LEGS ARMS HIPS EYES HANDS BACK NECK BRAIN EARS PLUS PTSD? VA STATED OLD AGE OR NEVER COMPLIED. WELL FOR ALL THAT DID WHERE ARE THEY???? YOU SEND PROOF. TO STATE SENATORS AND STATED WE WILL HELP I HAVE THREE STATE SENATORS THAT GOT LETTERS TOLD I CANT READ OR SEE/ SMELL TALK OR CALL TO TELL US WHAT THE HELL. GOD BLESS TERRY OLLIGES

  120. Terry Olliges says:

    Well still here. Hi Ed, Tom, Don, John, Conrad, Floyd. Ain’t giving up. Pain in the ass. Hope all of you are OK. Ain’t got nothing to say repeat. repeat. They dont listen. I can say that if you worked down range you WERE made sick real SICK… Point blank, WE can prove IT ???? no help they know but think we may take away their bonus? We all have the same things wrong with all of us. Whistle blowers where are you. A lot of money it just takes just one. Read and learn. Money to all others but say are helping; thats bull. Have a short time left but a lifetime with my God and all my sisters and brothers and few friends. Happy New Year and God bless. And Sunday go to church then go out to dinner with your family. Home watch bonanza. disneyland, but most of all get a good night sleep. love terry o good night.

  121. Terry Olliges says:

    Well still here. Hi each and all. Been a year and no word from VA. Not doing too good. Bones keep getting more brittle now the neck bones are breaking off takes along time to heal. What the hell does it take? Told me i need to be in a wheelchair because i keep passing out VA doctors have no explanation for this. Stopped all bp meds stated better high then low. Eyes bulging out. Can not walk without leaning to one side. VA said can you eat well then you are ok. Old did not work with that. Well where in the hell was i? Lost my mind for 4 years? Lost and cant get up well them folks in Washington they spend more on dinner. $128 dollars dont even pay for my meds. Travel pay is joke. Well i am going to get neck cut open because of bones chipping off. Need two major surgeries. I have had over 30 surgeries – eyes, hip, both arms, hands, hernia surgery 3 times, ribs, ankle. Hearing gave me hearing aids but then tell me i hear good??? Cant drive. pass out. if you need info i have it on all the crap. Ralph call 1502 612 2099 don tom floyd and GOD BLESS EACH AND ALL good luck with VA. Teresa and Terry O. If you would like to file a law suit you can call me. Dont wait too long. We could die from rad. toc gamma beta and other things radar and food.

  122. I came across your site (http://nikemissile.org/dangers_working_on.shtml) after learning about the explosion at the NY-53 Leonardo/Middletown location in 1958: http://www.themilitarystandard.com/missile/nike/ny-nj.php

    I grew up very close to the site in the 1970s and anecdotally we believe there is a higher incidence of cancer rates in residents not far from the site. This presentation (not by anyone I know) documents the location as 10 Windy Hill Lane, Atlantic Highlands, NJ.
    http://ed-thelen.org/pics/NY-53ControlArea.pdf

    I grew up on Koosman Drive (near the Beacon Hill Country Club) and many neighbours and former neighbours report high rates of cancer, including among young people, including several deaths.

    Have you documented a similar pattern among veterans who worked on the NY-53 base or any of the other Nike sites? I would be interested to know.

    Thank you for your time and consideration. Feel free to contact me personally if you have any information: https://ginabu.com/contact/

  123. Don Mullis says:

    Some of you may want to put some time at this web site veterans-for-change.org/documents-library
    they have a lot if info on a lot of subjects.

  124. Terry Olliges says:

    During my recent hospital stay in January, 2020 I was first told they were going to get this figured out this time. That is has been going on way too long (my blood pressure issues). Then after a few days in they told me they didn’t know what was wrong with me & they probably would never know what was wrong with me and I would probably die before they would figure me out. They sized me for a wheelchair and released me after being in a week with no results. They put me on different blood pressure medicine which somewhat helps but is strong.

    God Bless.

  125. Joe Williams says:

    I was a 16H assigned to a Nike launch site in West Germany as LCT operator for 6 months. The rest of my duty was at a BOC working under s Tipsy radar. While at the launch site I would help my launch section clean up the barns. We would lock ourselves inside the barn, clean-up and then take a break. During these breaks, the crewmen would climb up on the missiles between the fuselage and the a fin and take a nap. Of course, i followed suit. later I learned that I had been napping on a 40-kiloton nuke with my head within 6 inches of the warhead. Five years ago I was diagnosed with papillary thyroid cancer and had my thyroid removed. When I asked the DR. what the most common cause of this cancer was, he said “Exposure to radiation as a young adult”. Apparently this is the most common cancer experienced by those around Hiroshima and Nagasake.

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